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RedHotList 2013/14

Last updated 7 months ago

These are pages that are on the current EOL RedHotList (the high priority list of organisms for which we believe high quality rich content is most critical for broad audiences) and are considered appropriately curated and sufficiently rich. The EOL Rapid Response team is largely responsible for reviewing and enhancing these pages, many of which were formerly in the RedHotList Pending collection. We invite anyone who enjoys writing, editing, and curating to join the Rapid Response Team and help us move pages from the RedHotList Pending to the RedHotList collections.

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  • Profile picture of Frédéric Ducarme who took this action.

    Frédéric Ducarme marked the classification from "World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS)" as preferred for "Cephea cephea (Forskål)".

    6 days ago

  • Profile picture of Jeff Holmes who took this action.

    Jeff Holmes added the English common name "southern leopard frog" to "Lithobates sphenocephalus (Cope, 1886)".

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of C. Michael Hogan who took this action.

    C. Michael Hogan marked the classification from "Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life: April 2013" as preferred for "Poa arida Vasey".

    about 1 month ago

  • Profile picture of C. Michael Hogan who took this action.

    C. Michael Hogan marked the classification from "Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life: April 2013" as preferred for "Berberis".

    2 months ago

  • Profile picture of Kibi78704 who took this action.

    Kibi78704 commented on "Berberis":

    Just out of curiosity, why is the preferred English common name a French name?

    2 months ago

  • Profile picture of C. Michael Hogan who took this action.

    C. Michael Hogan marked the classification from "Clements Checklist resource" as preferred for "Passeridae".

    3 months ago

  • Profile picture of Woojin Song who took this action.

    Woojin Song added the Korean common name "큰장수앵무" to "Alisterus scapularis (Lichtenstein, 1816)".

    3 months ago

  • Profile picture of Celeste South who took this action.

    Celeste South commented on "Dasyurus viverrinus (Shaw, 1800)":

    @Katja Schulz: Katja....Well, my first attempt didn't work out as planned, I thought "My Insights" would have been included at the end of the aticle. Instead, I had to add my insights to the article as a reply/response. I apologize and hhope it dosn't lessen the impact of the article. If you could let me know what you think (is the article appropriate for the EOL community and is "My Insight" helpful, needed, etc. While my written insights appear in corect form (paragraphs) after I pasted it in the section, after posting, it came out as one long paragraph in the reply/response section with no known way to edit it (when I attempted to edit it, it looked perfectly fine in edit mod . I do apologize for that, as it is cumbersome to read.

    4 months ago

  • Profile picture of Celeste South who took this action.

    Celeste South commented on "Dasyurus viverrinus (Shaw, 1800)":

    @Katja Schulz: Thanks Katja, I have an article under "Scoop It" written by EarthJustice, "7 Ways Congress is Trying to Destroy the ESA" with my insights as an Endangered Species Recovery Biologist. That will be my first contribution. I would greatly appreciate any feedback re my "insights". Thanks

    4 months ago

  • Profile picture of Katja Schulz who took this action.

    Katja Schulz commented on "Dasyurus viverrinus (Shaw, 1800)":

    @Celeste South: Hi Celeste, you can add text directly to EOL species pages (rather than to the comments feed). Simply go to the Detail tab, and look for the add an article button. Since you are a full curator, your contributions will automatically be classified as trusted content. Let me know if you need help with anything.

    4 months ago

  • Profile picture of Celeste South who took this action.

    Celeste South commented on "Dasyurus viverrinus (Shaw, 1800)":

    Endangered Species Week, Eastern Quoll "Eastern Quolls To Be Finally Reintroduced To Mainland Australia After 50 Years Of Extinction", The Guardian The eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus), also known as the eastern native cat, is a medium-sized carnivorous dasyurid marsupial native to Australia. They are now considered extinct on the mainland, but remain widespread and even locally common in Tasmania. It is one of six extant species of quolls. The eastern quoll was formerly found across much of southeastern mainland Australia, from the eastern coasts of South Australia, through most of Victoria, to the central coast of New South Wales. It died out on the continent around 1963, but remains widespread in Tasmania, and is also found today on Bruny Island, to which it is probably not native. Within Tasmania, eastern quolls inhabit rainforest, heathland, alpine areas, and scrub below 1,500 m (4,900 ft). However, they prefer dry grassland and forest mosaics, bounded by agricultural land, particularly where pasture grubs are common. Conservation The main threats to the eastern quoll are competition and predation from feral cats and illegal poisoning and trapping. The lack of foxes and dingoes in Tasmania is believed[by whom?] to have contributed to the survival of the species. The last mainland eastern quoll specimen was collected as roadkill in Sydney's Nielsen Park, Vaucluse on 31 January 1963. The National Parks and Wildlife service reported numerous unconfirmed sightings until 1999 (the year of the report), and the species was reported sighted as recently as 2006. Specimens collected in 2005 and 2008 west of Melbourne, Victoria, are likely connected with a nearby Conservation and Research Centre, either as direct escapees, or the descendants of escapees from that facility. Reintroduction to the Mainland Overseen by Parks Victoria, Australian National University, Rewilding Australia and Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council, this project will rehome 40 eastern quolls into this national park next year. “We want to get a top order predator back into the park, so we can restore the ecosystem. The quolls eat spiders, cockroaches, that sort of thing, and may also take out rabbits, which is a good thing in terms of pests,” said head of Rewilding Australia Rob Brewster to the Guardian. “We want them to breed and disperse. We’d hope that having them back will be a big community engagement tool. We can involve communities in better protection of vegetation because they’ll have this species in the vicinity." Rewilding Australia wants to take animal conservation to the next level by actively rehousing species into their natural habitat, such as the Tasmanian devil and the dingo. With the promotion of environmental education, Rewilding Australia hopes that nearby communities will learn about and take better care of their surrounding wildlife. However, it’s unlikely that the eastern quolls’ numbers will grow to their previously established figures without an imposed cull of their feral predators. Seeking to tackle this threat, the Australian Government are holding a threatened species summit in July to further discuss the reintroduction and sustainability of wildlife, such as the eastern quoll. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_quoll http://www.iflscience.com/…/eastern-quolls-be-finally-reint… Photo 1, 2 - Wiki Photo 3 - Deb Talan

    4 months ago

  • Profile picture of Valter Jacinto who took this action.

    Valter Jacinto added the Brazilian Portuguese common name "Marreco" to "Anas querquedula Linnaeus 1758".

    4 months ago

  • Profile picture of Deniz Martinez who took this action.

    Deniz Martinez marked the English common name "Linné's two-toed sloth" from "Choloepus didactylus (Linnaeus, 1758)" as trusted.

    4 months ago

  • Profile picture of Valter Jacinto who took this action.

    Valter Jacinto added the Brazilian Portuguese common name "Cegonha-preta" to "Ciconia nigra (Linnaeus, 1758)".

    4 months ago

  • Profile picture of Valter Jacinto who took this action.

    Valter Jacinto added the Brazilian Portuguese common name "Abetarda" to "Otis tarda Linnaeus 1758".

    4 months ago

  • Profile picture of Frédéric Ducarme who took this action.
  • Profile picture of Frédéric Ducarme who took this action.
  • Profile picture of Frédéric Ducarme who took this action.
  • Profile picture of Marcus Schultz who took this action.

    Marcus Schultz commented on "Macropanesthia rhinoceros Saussure, 1895":

    @Michael Hecht: I am told that eucalyptus leaves are the best food. But the only thing stopping me from purchasing some via Amazon, is their diet. Could they be fed things similar to Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches? I imagine a roach cannot be too picky, or there wouldn't be so many of them! Can they be held as much as you would a MHC? I found a source saying they get stressed if held too much. Stress can cause them to lose weight apparently among other problems. So would I be safe in buying dried eucalyptus leaves via Amazon as well?

    5 months ago

  • Profile picture of Deniz Martinez who took this action.

    Deniz Martinez added the English common name "Wood Fox" to "Cerdocyon thous (Linnaeus, 1766)".

    6 months ago