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Plants of Economic Importance

Last updated over 2 years ago

  • 13205_88_88 Plantae > Euphorbiaceae

    Homalanthus nutans

    Mamala Tree

    The AIDS drug prostratin was developed from this plant as a result of leads obtained from Paul Cox's work in Samoa.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C. 2007. Chapter 3. Twenty-five Important Plant Families. B.C. Bennett, editor. UNESCO Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems. http://eolss.net.

    Sort value: Euphorbiaceae

  • 01318_88_88 Plantae > Euphorbiaceae

    Croton lechleri

    Dragon's Blood

    Croton lecheri is medically important to many indigenous people of South America. The sap is used in traditional South American medicine, both internally and externally, to treat a variety of ailments including: cancer, flesh wounds, fractures, hemorrhoids, intestinal fevers, inflamed or infect gums, as an anti-viral for respiratory and stomach viruses, HIV, in vaginal baths before and after childbirth, as a vaginal douche, for hemorrhaging after childbirth, for skin disorders, and for mouth, throat, intestinal and stomach ulcers. Much scientific investigation into the efficacy of C. lecheri sap was done from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s and pharmaceutical patents have since been taken out on related and derivative products.

    References:
    • James A. Duke, 1997 "The Green Pharmacy: New Discoveries in Herbal Remedies for Common Diseases and Conditions from the World's Foremost Authority on Healing Herbs." Rodale.
    • Leslie Taylor. 2005. "The Healing Power of Rainforest Herbs: A Guide to Understanding and Using Herbal Medicinals." Square One Publishers.
    • Bennett, B.C. 2007. Chapter 3. Twenty-five Important Plant Families. B.C. Bennett, editor. UNESCO Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems. http://eolss.net.

    Sort value: Euphorbiaceae

  • 70375_88_88 Plantae > Fabaceae

    Glycine max

    Soybean

    Soybean seeds furnish one of the world's most important sources of oil and protein. Unripe seeds are eaten as vegetable and dried seeds eaten whole, split or sprouted. Processed they give soy milk, a valuable protein supplement in infant feeding which also provides curds and cheese. Soy sauce made from the mature fermented beans, and soy is an ingredient in other sauces.

    Source: James A. Duke. 1983. Handbook of Energy Crops. unpublished: Glycine max (L.) Merr.

    Sort value: Fabaceae

  • 53279_88_88 cellular organisms > Fabaceae

    Mimosoideae

    The species with in the Igna tribe of Mimosoideae are tree legumes that are cultivated for their edible fruit.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C. 2007. Chapter 3. Twenty-five Important Plant Families. B.C. Bennett, editor. UNESCO Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems. http://eolss.net.

    Sort value: Fabaceae

  • 16797_88_88 Plantae > Fabaceae

    Phaseolus

    Bean

    Many species of this genus yield commonly eaten beans, a significant source of non-animal protein for humans. Commonly eaten species include: P. acutifolius, P. coccineus, P. lunatus and P. vulgaris.

    References:
    Bennett, B.C., 2007. Twenty-Five Economically Important Plant Families.

    Sort value: Fabaceae (Leguminosae)

  • 00153_88_88 Plantae > Poaceae

    Secale cereale

    Cereal Rye

    Cereal rye is cultivated for the grain, used to make flour, the importance of which is second only to wheat. Canadian and United States whiskies are made mainly from rye. Roasted grains substitute for coffee. Grains mixed with others are used for livestock feed. As pasturage, crop grazed fall or spring and then allowed to head-out and mature. Probably native to southwestern Asia, but now widely cultivated in the temperate regions of the world. Grown in every state in the United States, often where conditions are unfavorable for wheat.

    Source: James A. Duke. 1983. Handbook of Energy Crops. unpublished: Secale cereale L.

    Sort value: Poaceae

  • 28174_88_88

    What do we eat?

    14 items; maintained by Eating biodiversity

  • 16996_88_88 Plantae > Asparagaceae

    Agave tequilana F. A. C. Weber

    Blue Agave

    Agave tequilana, or Blue Agave, is the only species of agave that can be used to produce Tequila certified by the Mexican government. According to the Tequila Regulatory Council of Mexico, a distilled alcoholic spirit must be made from at least 51% Blue Agave to be recognized as Tequila under the Norma Oficial Mexicana (NOM-006-SCFI-2012). Pure Tequila must be made from 100% Blue Agave (NOM-006-SCFI-2012).

    See "Detail" tab on species page to read more.

    References:
    Centro de Información de la Dirección General de Normas de la Secretaría de Economía (2012) NOM-006-SCFI-2012. Catálogo de Normas Oficiales Mexicanas.
  • 20709_88_88 Plantae > Asteraceae

    Dahlia

    Dahlia