Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is known only from western Sabah (Malaysia) and north-eastern Kalimantan (Indonesia), Borneo, below 1,300m asl.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It has been found only in hilly rainforests. Breeding occurs in clear, rocky streams, and larvae cling to the rocks in strong currents and feed on lithophytic algae.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
NT
Near Threatened

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2004
  • Needs updating

Assessor/s
Robert Inger, Djoko Iskandar, Indraneil Das, Robert Stuebing, Maklarin Lakim, Paul Yambun, Mumpuni

Reviewer/s
Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Near Threatened since although this species is still relatively widely distributed, it depends on streams in areas of undisturbed forest habitat, and so its Area of Occupancy is probably not much greater than 2,000 km2, and the extent and quality of its habitat is declining very rapidly due to widespread forest loss within its range, thus making the species close to qualifying for Vulnerable.
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Population

Population
The population status of this species is unknown.

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats
The principal threat to this species is habitat loss due to clear-cutting.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It has been recorded from the protected areas of Gunung Kinabalu, the Crocker Range and Kayanmantaran National Park.
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Wikipedia

Meristogenys whiteheadi

Meristogenys whiteheadi is a species of frog in the Ranidae family. It is endemic to Borneo and found in both Indonesia (northern Kalimantan) and Malaysia (Sabah, Sarawak). Its common name is Whitehead's Borneo frog[3][1] or Whitehead’s torrent frog.[4] It is named after John Whitehead, explorer who collected the type series from Mount Kinabalu.[2]

Description[edit]

The dorsum is light brown to greenish dark brown. The lips are dark grey to black. The iris is bicoloured, with a reddish orange horizontal band in the middle surrounded by whitish brown bands above and below. The centre of the tympanum usually has a small light circle. The limbs have alternating light- and dark-brown dorsal cross-bars. The rear of thigh is light brown with scattered light dots. The throat and chest are whitish, with dark dots; abdomen is whitish. The legs are whitish ventrally, with patches of pigmentation.[4] The pattern may vary between locations.[5]

Meristogenys whiteheadi are relatively large frogs. Males from Sabah measured 49–62 mm (1.9–2.4 in) in snout–vent length (SVL) and females 78–87 mm (3.1–3.4 in) SVL. Males from Sarawak measured 49–57 mm (1.9–2.2 in) SVL and females 77–80 mm (3.0–3.1 in) SVL.[5]

Habitat and conservation[edit]

Meristogenys whiteheadi occur in hilly rainforests. They breed in clear, rocky streams. The tadpoles cling to the rocks in strong currents and feed on lithophytic algae.[1]

Meristogenys whiteheadi is threatened by habitat loss caused by logging.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Inger, R., Iskandar, D., Das, I., Stuebing, R., Lakim, M., Yambun, P. & Mumpuni (2004). "Meristogenys whiteheadi". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 11 November 2014. 
  2. ^ a b Boulenger, G. A. (1887). "On new reptiles and batrachians from North Borneo". Annals and Magazine of Natural History, Series 5 20: 95–97. 
  3. ^ Frost, Darrel R. (2014). "Meristogenys whiteheadi (Boulenger, 1887)". Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6.0. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 11 November 2014. 
  4. ^ a b Haas, A., Hertwig, S.T., Das, I. (2014). "Meristogenys whiteheadi (Whitehead’s Torrent Frog)". Frogs of Borneo. Retrieved 11 November 2014.  (includes photographs)
  5. ^ a b Inger, Robert F.; Stuebing, Robert B. (2009). "New species and new records of Bornean frogs (Amphibia: Anura)". Raffles Bulletin of Zoology 57: 527–535. 
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