Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Spanish (19) (learn more)

Overview

Distribution

Aramus guarauna is found in the southeastern United States, West Indies, and from southern Mexico to Argentina. (Peterson, 1999)

Biogeographic Regions: atlantic ocean (Native )

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Range: (20,000-2,500,000 square km (about 8000-1,000,000 square miles)) Resident in southeastern Georgia, Florida, Greater Antilles (rare or extirpated in Puerto Rico), and from southern Mexico to South America.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Aramus guarauna appears to be a cross between a crane and a rail. It is roughly 28" tall. Aramus guarauna is of a brown coloration with white spots and streaks. It has long legs and a drooping bill. Aramus guarauna's flight is crane-like in apperance. There is very little difference between the males and females of this species. (Peterson, 1999)

Other Physical Features: endothermic ; bilateral symmetry

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Size

Length: 66 cm

Weight: 1080 grams

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Differs from large rails in being at least 28 cm longer and in having prominent white streaks on the upperparts. Differs from large sandpipers in being much larger and having a heavier bill. Similarly shaped sandpipers, and glossy and white-faced ibises, do not have prominent white streaks on the upperparts.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
  • Freshwater
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Aramus guarauna is found near fresh swamps and marshes. In Florida, it is found in open freshwater marshes, along the shores of ponds and lakes, and in wooded swamps along rivers and near springs. Throughout most of its tropical range, its habitat and distribution are dictated by the presence of apple snails. (Peterson, 1999)

Aquatic Biomes: rivers and streams; coastal

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Comments: Swampy forest, marshes, mangroves. Open freshwater marshes, pond and river margins, occasionally wooded swamps (Stiles and Skutch 1989).

Nests in sawgrass or loose mass of leaves just above water, in vines growing over shrubs along streams, or in bushes or trees along deeper streams (Terres 1980).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Migration

Non-Migrant: Yes. At least some populations of this species do not make significant seasonal migrations. Juvenile dispersal is not considered a migration.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Trophic Strategy

The diet of Aramus guarauna consists of freshwater snails (Apple Snails in Florida), mussels, seeds, small reptiles and frogs, insects, worms, and crayfish. (Jurica, 1999) The Limpkin forages by walking in shallow water, searching for snails visually, also by probing in mud and among vegetation. The tip of the bill usually curves slightly to the right, which may help in removing snails from their curved shell. Its bill also usually has a slight gap just behind the tips of the mandibles, which may help in carrying and manipulating snails. (Wakulla, 1999)

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Comments: Eats freshwater snails, especially POMACEA, also freshwater mussels, some lizards, frogs, insects, worms, crayfishes (Terres 1980).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 81 to >300

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Abundance

10,000 to >1,000,000 individuals

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

General Ecology

In Costa Rica, makes pronounced local movements according to water levels (Stiles and Skutch 1989).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Perception Channels: visual ; tactile ; acoustic ; chemical

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Reproduction

Not much is known about the breeding habits of Aramus guarauna. First of all, the site for the nest varies, ranging from on the ground near water, in the marsh grass just above the water, or in shrubs or trees above or near water, up to 20 feet high or sometimes much higher. The nest is essentially a platform of reeds and grasses, lined with finer plant material. The nest usually contains 4 to 8 eggs, olive to buff, and blotched with brown and gray in color. Both sexes are known to incubate the eggs, but the incubation period is not exactly known. The young, covered with down, leave the nest within a day after hatching and follow one or both of the parents. Both parents take care of feeding the young. The development of the young and the age that they achieve flight are unknown. (Wakulla, 1999)

Key Reproductive Features: iteroparous ; gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); sexual ; oviparous

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors

Source: Animal Diversity Web

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

In the north, eggs are laid mostly in March-April. Clutch size is 4-8. Incubation is by both sexes. Young leave nest on day of hatching.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Aramus guarauna

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 6 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.

Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.

See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

ACTCTACCTAATCTTTGGTGCATGAGCTGGTATAATTGGCACTGCCCTCAGCTTACTAATCCGCGCAGAACTCGGCCAACCAGGAAGCCTGCTAGGAGATGACCAAATCTACAACGTAATCGTCACTGCCCATGCCTTCGTAATAATCTTTTTCATAGTCATACCAATCATAATCGGAGGATTTGGAAACTGACTAGTCCCACTTATAATCGGTGCCCCAGACATAGCATTCCCACGTATAAACAACATAAGCTTCTGGTTACTACCCCCTTCTTTCCTATTACTGCTTGCCTCCTCCACAGTAGAAGCGGGAGCGGGCACAGGATGAACCGTATACCCACCACTAGCAGGTAACCTGGCCCACGCTGGAGCCTCAGTAGACCTAGCCATCTTCTCCCTCCACTTAGCAGGTGTGTCCTCCATCCTAGGAGCAATCAACTTCATCACAACCGCCATCAACATAAAACCACCAGCCCTATCACAATACCAAACACCCCTATTCGTGTGATCCGTATTAATTACTGCTGTCCTATTACTACTCTCCCTCCCAGTCCTCGCCGCTGGCATCACTATACTCCTAACGGACCGAAACCTCAACACCACATTCTTTGATCCCGCTGGAGGCGGAGACCCGGTCCTATATCAACACCTTNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
-- end --

Download FASTA File

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Aramus guarauna

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 6
Specimens with Barcodes: 6
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
BirdLife International

Reviewer/s
Butchart, S. & Symes, A.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size is extremely large, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

History
  • Least Concern (LC)
  • Least Concern (LC)
  • Least Concern (LC)
  • Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)
  • Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)
  • Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5