Overview

Distribution

Range Description

King Genet is recorded from Liberia, Cte dIvoire, Ghana, Equatorial Guinea (Bioko I.), and Republic of Congo (Gaubert 2003, 2013).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The localities from which the species has been collected to date suggest that it might be restricted to rainforest (Gaubert 2003, 2013).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
DD
Data Deficient

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2015

Assessor/s
Gaubert, P. & Do Linh San, E.

Reviewer/s
Duckworth, J.W. & Hoffmann, M.

Contributor/s
Dunham, A.

Justification
Listed as Data Deficient because this species is known only from 10 museum specimens, with no confirmed records since 1946, and the habitat requirements and distribution range are not well known.It often has been considered synonymous with other large-spotted genet taxa (especially Pardine GenetGenetta pardina), and the uncertainty surrounding its status islikely to owe much to past confusion with other genets. The data are so uncertain that all categories between Critically Endangered under criterion C2a(i) (reflecting small population size and decline) and Least Concern are plausible categories. Surveys are urgentlyneeded to determine the current distribution, size and threats to subpopulations.

History
  • Data Deficient (DD)
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Population

Population
There is no information on the population status of this species, but the scarcity of records suggests that it is rare and localised. It is represented by 10 known specimens in collections, and has neither been collected nor observed in the wild since 1946 (Gaubert 2003, 2013). In is unknown whether the possible confusion with other genet species (e.g., Pardine Genet G. pardina and Large-spotted Genet G. maculata) also partly explains the 'lack' of records.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
Threats to this species are unclear, but hunting is a likely threat because most of the museum specimens were collected from local hunters or bushmeat markets (Gaubert 2013).Deforestation might also represent a threat in parts of its range.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It is not known whether this species occurs in any protected areas.
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Wikipedia

King genet

The king genet (Genetta poensis) is a species of carnivorous mammal of the family Viverridae. It is distributed within west central Africa, close to the equator, and is native to the Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Liberia, Ghana, and Côte d'Ivoire.[1] The King genet is often considered to be conspecific with G. pardina.

The King Genet inhabits lowland tropical rainforest ecosystems.[1] Hunting for the bushmeat market may be a threat.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Gaubert, P. & Dunham, A. (2008). "Genetta poensis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2009.1. International Union for Conservation of Nature. http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/136435. Retrieved 17 August 2009.
  2. ^ Wilson, Don E.; Reeder, DeeAnn M., eds. (2005), Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed), Johns Hopkins University Press, http://www.bucknell.edu/msw3/browse.asp?s=y&id=14000400, retrieved 17 August 2009


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