Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Crested Genet has mostly been recorded in Nigeria and Cameroon. It has been recorded as ranging from the Niger River eastwards to the Sanaga River, but there are also records of the species from west of the Niger Delta (Van Rompaey and Colyn 2013). The region between the Niger Delta and the Cross River is heavily populated and a mosaic of forest patches and cultivated land, but recent records do exist: for example, one was bought at the roadside near Azumini (Angelici and Luiselli 2005). Gaubert et al. (2006) give records that show this species ranging more than 500 km south of the Sanaga River to southern Cameroon, Gabon and Republic of Congo, as well as 180 km west of the known range in Nigeria between Oni and Epe (but these are not mapped). The species ranges from sea level to more than 1,000 m a.s.l.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species inhabits scrub, low tangled vegetation, and bare ground below trees in tall deciduous forest. Occasionally, it is also present in secondary and montane forest (Van Rompaey and Colyn 2013). In Nigeria, Angelici and Luiselli (2005) found that the presence of this species was statistically correlated with the presence of primary dry forest and bushmango plantations inside the forest, and to a lesser extent secondary dry forest, and primary flooded forest but negatively influenced by the presence of suburban areas, pineapple plantations, bushlands, and oil-palm plantations.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
VU
Vulnerable

Red List Criteria
C1

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2015

Assessor/s
Gaubert, P., Angelici, F.M. & Do Linh San, E.

Reviewer/s
Duckworth, J.W. & Hoffmann, M.

Contributor/s

Justification
Crested Genet is listed as Vulnerable based on a total population containing ca. 7,000 mature individuals (roughly estimated based on a range area ofca100,000 km, an average population density highly unlikely to exceed one individual/10 km, and a proportion of mature individuals of 67%) and the likelihood that the species underwent a population decline of at least 10% over the last 12 years (assuming a generation length of four years) because of habitat loss coupled with the impacts of hunting in its range.

History
  • Vulnerable (VU)
  • 1996
    Endangered (EN)
  • 1994
    Endangered (E)
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Population

Population
In the Niger Delta area the Crested Genet seems to be common where it occurs, but there is no information on its abundance east of the Cross River (Van Rompaey and Colyn 2013).

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats
Habitat loss is probably a major threat to this species, since the Cross River State forests are rapidly being converted into farms or wastelands and the Niger Delta is exploited as an oil-production area. Thespecies isalso believed to suffer from high hunting pressure (Van Rompaey and Colyn 2013).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It is not known whether this species occurs in any protected areas, but it may occur in the Cross River National Park There is no protected area in the Niger Delta.
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Wikipedia

Crested servaline genet

The crested servaline genet (Genetta cristata), also simply known as the crested genet, is a mammal from the Carnivora order, family Viverridae. It is related to civets and linsangs. Its name comes from the small crest on the back of the animal's neck. This species of genet inhabits dry forests of south-eastern Nigeria.[2]. Its continued presence in southern Cameroon, and its presence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Gabon are uncertain.[2]

The crested servaline Genet is considered vulnerable on the IUCN Red List, due to loss of habitat and over-hunting.[2] The Cross River State Forests are being converted into farms and wastelands while the Niger Delta is used as an oil-production area. Both of these regions are common areas where this genet is seen.[2]

Some authorities[who?] have considered this species to be a subspecies of the servaline genet (Genetta servalina), but it is now generally regarded as a full species on its own.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M., eds. (2005). "Genetta cristata". Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Van Rompaey H, Gaubert P & Hoffmann M (2008). Genetta cristata. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 2008-10-13.
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