Ecology

Associations

Known prey organisms

Cambaridae (Crayfish (N=2)) preys on:
detritus
Plant material
Terrestrial invertebrates
Cyanobacteria
Navicula avenacea
Pinnularia
Coloburiscus humeralis
Deleatidium
Hydrobiosella stenocerca
Oligochaeta II
Lumbriculidae blue
Oligochaeta I
organic matter
Aeolosoma
Wormaldia moesta
Oligo smooth
organic detritus
Sphaerium occidentale

Based on studies in:
New Zealand: Otago, Akatore, Akatore catchment (River)
New Zealand: Otago, Catlins, Craggy Tor catchment (River)
New Zealand: Otago, Narrowdale catchment (River)
USA: North Carolina, Coweeta (River)
USA: Maine, Troy (River)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:1194
Specimens with Sequences:1187
Specimens with Barcodes:1160
Species:189
Species With Barcodes:189
Public Records:1146
Public Species:189
Public BINs:274
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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Cambaridae

Cambaridae is the largest of the three families of freshwater crayfish, with over 400 species.[1] Most of the species in the family are native to North America east of the Great Divide, such as the invasive species Procambarus clarkii and Orconectes rusticus, with fewer species living in East Asia and Japan, such as zarigani (Cambaroides japonicus).

A 2006 molecular study suggested that the family Cambaridae may be paraphyletic, with the family Astacidae nested within it, and the status of the genus Cambaroides remains unclear.[2]

References

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