Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species was endemic to Australia, where it was generally restricted to south-eastern South Australia. The last wild individuals were recorded in 1924, although a few captives survived until around 1937. Surveys conducted by the South Australia National Parks and Wildlife Service suggest that the species persisted until the early 1970's (Smith and Robinson 2008).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species was found in areas of open country. It lived at the edge of Stringy-bark heath in grassy areas too wet in winter to support eucalypt cover (Smith and Robinson 2008).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EX
Extinct

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Australasian Mammal Assessment Workshop

Reviewer/s
Lamoreux, J. & Hilton-Taylor, C. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Extinct because the last wild individuals of Macropus greyi were recorded in 1924, although a few captives survived until around 1937. This species has not be recorded since, despite extensive research in the region.

History
  • 1996
    Extinct
  • 1994
    Extinct
    (Groombridge 1994)
  • 1990
    Extinct
    (IUCN 1990)
  • 1988
    Extinct
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1988)
  • 1986
    Extinct
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1986)
  • 1982
    Extinct
    (Thornback and Jenkins 1982)
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Population

Population
It is presumed to be extinct.
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Threats

Major Threats
Introduced predators, competition from livestock, bounty and sport hunting, and direct killing for the animal's pelt have resulted in the extinction of the species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Any reports of the persistence of this species, including finds of recent remains, should be investigated to determine whether it is possibly still extant.
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Wikipedia

Toolache wallaby

The toolache wallaby or Grey's wallaby[3] (Macropus greyi) is an extinct species of wallaby from south-eastern South Australia and South-western Victoria.

Description[edit]

The toolache wallaby was a slim, graceful, and elegant creature that had a pale ashy-brown pelt with a buff-yellow underbelly. The tail was pale grey and became almost white near the tip. The distinct black mark on its face reached from its nose to the eye. The forearms, feet, and tips of the ears were also black. The different colors of the animal also consisted of different textured furs which are believed to have changed seasonally or varied depending on the individual. The body measurements differed between males and females. In general, male toolache wallabies had a head and body length up to 810 mm while females measured up as 840 mm. Despite the females being taller, males had longer tail lengths at about 730 mm while the females tail length was 710 mm.

Habitat[edit]

The toolache wallaby occupied the south-eastern corner of Australia to the western part of Victoria. The preferred habitat ranged from swampy short grassland areas, to taller grassed areas of the open country. The toolache wallaby was also known to be sociable creatures who lived in groups; often seen resting and grazing in groups.

Threats[edit]

A combination of numerous threats caused the decline and eventual extinction of the toolache wallaby. One of the largest factors was the destruction of its habitat. Since swamps were an important part of its habitat, once they were cleared out, much of the vegetation went with it. Besides the destruction of its habitat, the introduction of predators such as the European Fox began to kill off the species as well. On top of all this, the animal was also hunted for sport and for its beautiful pelt.

Extinction[edit]

The toolache wallaby only survived only 85 years after European occupation. In the 1920s, a conservation effort was made to try and bring the animal back from the brink of extinction. The plan was to capture and breed the last known surviving members of the species in captivity. This effort ended in disaster after 10 of the 14 of them were accidentally killed in attempt to capture them. The remaining four survived in captivity. The last wild sightings were recorded in 1924, and the last known toolache wallaby survived in captivity until 1937. The species is presumed to be extinct although extensive research is still being conducted in the region after reports of suspected sightings were reports through the 1970s. However, no members of the species have been sighted since.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Groves, C. P. (2005). Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M, eds. Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. OCLC 62265494. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. 
  2. ^ Australasian Mammal Assessment Workshop (2008). Macropus greyi. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 28 December 2008. Database entry includes justification for why this species is listed as extinct
  3. ^ Green, Tamara (2001). Extinctosaurus: Encyclopedia of Lost and Endangered Species. Brimax. p. 148. 
  • Flannery, T and P Schouten, "A Gap in Nature," Atlantic Monthly Press, 2001, pg. 152. ISBN 0-87113-797-6
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