Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This endemic Australian species is known only from a single skull found in the Lake Mackay area on the Western Australia Northern Territory border. It has not been recorded since the collection of this specimen in 1932. There are oral history records presumed to be of this species up to the early 1960s (Burbidge et al. 1988).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It inhabited desert sand plains and dunes with spinifex (Triodia) hummock grassland (Burbidge et al. 2008).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EX
Extinct

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Burbidge, A. & Johnson, K.

Reviewer/s
Lamoreux, J. & Hilton-Taylor, C. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Extinct because Lagorchestes asomatus is known only from a single skull taken in 1932, although oral history suggests that it might have survived until the early 1960s.

History
  • 1996
    Extinct (EX)
  • 1994
    Extinct (Ex)
  • 1990
    Extinct (Ex)
  • 1988
    Extinct (Ex)
  • 1986
    Extinct (Ex)
  • 1982
    Extinct (Ex)
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Population

Population
It is presumed to be extinct.
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Threats

Major Threats
Important factors in the decline of hare-wallabies are predation by introduced cats and foxes, and possibly changed fire regimes (A. Burbidge pers. comm.).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
None.
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Wikipedia

Lake Mackay hare-wallaby

The Lake Mackay hare-wallaby (Lagorchestes asomatus), also known as the central hare-wallaby or kuluwarri, is an extinct species of macropod formerly found in central Australia. Very little is known about it.[3]

The Lake Mackay hare-wallaby is known only from a single animal collected in 1932 between Mount Farewell and Lake Mackay in the Northern Territory. Only the skull was kept, and this is all the evidence scientists have today for the Lake Mackay hare-wallaby's existence. Its habitat is believed to have been desert sandhills.[3]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ Groves, C. P. (2005). Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M, eds. Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 62–63. OCLC 62265494. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. 
  2. ^ Burbidge, A. & Johnson, K. (2008). Lagorchestes asomatus. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 28 December 2008. Database entry includes justification for why this species is listed as extinct
  3. ^ a b Menkhorst, Peter (2001). A Field Guide to the Mammals of Australia. Oxford University Press. p. 108. 
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