Overview

Comprehensive Description

Ludwigia adscendens (L.) H. Hara, 1953

Materials

Type status: Other material. Occurrence: recordedBy: Y. Ito ; Location: country: Thailand ; locality: Hotel river Kwai, Kantchanabury ; verbatimLatitude: 14° 1' 59" N; verbatimLongitude: 99° 31' 10" E; Event: eventDate: Nov. 15, 2012 ; Record Level: collectionID: Y. Ito 1720; institutionCode: BKF

Type status: Other material. Occurrence: recordedBy: Y. Ito ; Location: country: Laos ; locality: Savannaket Province; Nakai Plateau, Theun Douan lake, near Phong Sa Vahn resettlement village. ; verbatimLatitude: 16° 34' 10" N; verbatimLongitude: 104° 44' 54" E; Event: eventDate: May. 4, 2007 ; Record Level: collectionID: J. F. Maxwell 07-313; institutionCode: GH

Type status: Other material. Occurrence: recordedBy: Y. Ito ; Location: country: Myanmar ; verbatimLatitude: 16° 53' 19" N; verbatimLongitude: 95° 52' 29" E; Event: eventDate: Dec. 8, 2006 ; Record Level: institutionCode: TI

Type status: Other material. Occurrence: recordedBy: Y. Ito ; Location: country: Myanmar ; verbatimLatitude: 16° 53' 19"; verbatimLongitude: 95° 52' 28" E; Event: eventDate: Dec. 1, 2008 ; Record Level: institutionCode: TI

Type status: Other material. Occurrence: recordedBy: Y. Ito ; Location: country: Thailand ; locality: Songkla Province, Talae Noi Waterfowl Reserve, N end of Lake Songkla, near Phattalung. ; verbatimLatitude: 7° 15' N; verbatimLongitude: 100° 26' 16" E; Event: eventDate: Dec. 28, 1978 ; Record Level: collectionID: G. Congdon & C. Hamilton #155; institutionCode: GH

Type status: Other material. Occurrence: recordedBy: Y. Ito ; Location: country: Thailand ; locality: Phetchabury. ; verbatimLatitude: 13° 24' 30" N; verbatimLongitude: 99° 48' 44" E; Event: eventDate: Nov. 14, 2012 ; Record Level: collectionID: Y. Ito 1709; institutionCode: BKF

Distribution

Bangladesh, Cambodia, China (nationwide), India (nationwide), Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Vietnam.

Public Domain

Plazi

Source: Plazi.org

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

Perennial creeping herb, rooting at the nodes, sometimes a floating aquatic. Stems often purple-red, prostrate or ascending. Leaves narrowly lanceolate, shiny dark green. Flowers solitary in the upper leaf axils, pale yellow with a darker spot at the base of the petals. Sepals and petals 5; stamens 10. Fruit a capsule, light brown with 10 conspicuous dark brown ribs.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Comments

Creeping Water Primrose has showy flowers and attractive foliage. Unfortunately, it is sometimes too aggressive for its own good. It can be distinguished from other Ludwigia spp. by its larger 5-petaled flowers and sprawling semi-aquatic habit. Across its range in the United States and tropical America, different varieties of this species have been described, although only var. glabrescens has been found in Illinois. This variety can be distinguished by its more glabrous foliage. Another scientific name of this wetland plant is Jussiaea repens glabrescens, while an alternative common name is Creeping Primrose Willow.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

This perennial plant is ¾–2½' long. It either floats on water or sprawls across the ground. The stems are light green to red (often the latter), glabrous to sparsely pubescent, and terete. Alternate leaves along these stems are 1¼–3" long and ½–1" across; they are elliptic, oblong-elliptic, oblanceolate, or oblong-oblanceolate in shape and smooth along their margins. The leaves are usually glossy green in appearance, although sometimes they develop patches of red or yellow. The upper leaf surface is glabrous, while the lower leaf surface is glabrous to sparsely pubescent. The leaf bases taper gradually into slender petioles about ½–2" long. Individual flowers develop from the axils of the middle to upper leaves on erect to semi-erect pedicels about 1–3" long. Each flower is about 1" across, consisting of 5 yellow petals, 5 light green sepals, 10 yellow stamens, and a narrowly cylindrical pistil with a single style. The petals are obovate in shape with pale pinnate nerves, while the smaller sepals are lanceolate. Compared to the size of the flower, both the stamens and style are relatively short. Between the apex of the pedicel and the bottom of the pistil, there is a pair of tiny bractlets (about 1.0–1.5 mm. in length). The blooming period occurs from late spring to early fall, lasting several months. The flowers are diurnal. Afterwards, the flowers are replaced by cylindrical seed capsules about 1–1½" long. Each seed capsule has 5 narrow cells, and each cell contains a row of seeds. The seeds are enclosed in chunky outer coatings (endocarps); they are about 1.0-1.5 mm. in length. The root system is fibrous and fleshy. When the nodes of the stems lie on wet ground, they are capable of developing new fibrous roots, from which new plants are produced vegetatively. Sometimes the root system produces small bladders that keep individual plants more buoyant in the water. This plant often forms large colonies.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ludwigia adscendens (L.) H. Hara, 1953

Materials

Type status: Other material. Occurrence: recordedBy: Y. Ito ; Location: country: Thailand ; locality: Hotel river Kwai, Kantchanabury ; verbatimLatitude: 14° 1' 59" N; verbatimLongitude: 99° 31' 10" E; Event: eventDate: Nov. 15, 2012 ; Record Level: collectionID: Y. Ito 1720; institutionCode: BKF

Type status: Other material. Occurrence: recordedBy: Y. Ito ; Location: country: Laos ; locality: Savannaket Province; Nakai Plateau, Theun Douan lake, near Phong Sa Vahn resettlement village. ; verbatimLatitude: 16° 34' 10" N; verbatimLongitude: 104° 44' 54" E; Event: eventDate: May. 4, 2007 ; Record Level: collectionID: J. F. Maxwell 07-313; institutionCode: GH

Type status: Other material. Occurrence: recordedBy: Y. Ito ; Location: country: Myanmar ; verbatimLatitude: 16° 53' 19" N; verbatimLongitude: 95° 52' 29" E; Event: eventDate: Dec. 8, 2006 ; Record Level: institutionCode: TI

Type status: Other material. Occurrence: recordedBy: Y. Ito ; Location: country: Myanmar ; verbatimLatitude: 16° 53' 19"; verbatimLongitude: 95° 52' 28" E; Event: eventDate: Dec. 1, 2008 ; Record Level: institutionCode: TI

Type status: Other material. Occurrence: recordedBy: Y. Ito ; Location: country: Thailand ; locality: Songkla Province, Talae Noi Waterfowl Reserve, N end of Lake Songkla, near Phattalung. ; verbatimLatitude: 7° 15' N; verbatimLongitude: 100° 26' 16" E; Event: eventDate: Dec. 28, 1978 ; Record Level: collectionID: G. Congdon & C. Hamilton #155; institutionCode: GH

Type status: Other material. Occurrence: recordedBy: Y. Ito ; Location: country: Thailand ; locality: Phetchabury. ; verbatimLatitude: 13° 24' 30" N; verbatimLongitude: 99° 48' 44" E; Event: eventDate: Nov. 14, 2012 ; Record Level: collectionID: Y. Ito 1709; institutionCode: BKF

Distribution

Bangladesh, Cambodia, China (nationwide), India (nationwide), Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Vietnam.

Public Domain

Plazi

Source: Plazi.org

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Miscellaneous Details

Notes: Ponds and ditches
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Brief

Flowering class: Dicot Habit: Herb
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Range Description

Ludwigia stolonifera is a pantropical species with a biogeographical distribution that covers Africa and Asia. In the Mediterranean region it is found in Turkey, Syria, Lebanon, Israel, Palestine, Libya, Egypt and the Sinai Peninsula. Its extent of occurrence covers c. 2,000,000 km2 and it occurs in numerous locations (>30). This taxon is very rare in Turkey, where it is found at these locations: Antalya: Elmalı; Hatay: İskenderun (Davis 1965-1985); Hatay: Reyhanlı, Yenişehir Gölü; Hatay: Kırıkhan, Balık Gölü (Seçmen and Leblebici 1997); Antalya: Lara-Perakende Kumulları ( 36º 51´ N, 31º 00´ E) (Özhatay et al. 2005). In Palestine, it is rare and present at seven locations: Acco Plain, Sharon Plain, Philistean Plain, Esdraelon Plain, Dan Valley, Hula Plain, Upper Jordan Valley, Golan.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Worldwide distribution

Throughout Africa and from Israel and Lebanon to Iraq.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Range and Habitat in Illinois

Creeping Water Primrose is locally common and native to southern Illinois, while in the rest of the state it is uncommon and probably adventive in most areas (see Distribution Map). This species is slowly spreading northward. Habitats include borders of ponds, shallow areas of lakes, sluggish streams, swamps, marshes, and ditches. In some of these habitats, Creeping Water Primrose can become the dominant shoreline plant, forming large colonies.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

"Maharashtra: Thane Karnataka: Belgaum, Coorg, Hassan, Mysore, N. Kanara, Shimoga Kerala: Alapuzha, Idukki, Kasaragod, Kollam, Kottayam, Kozhikode, Malapuram, Pathanamthitta Tamil Nadu: All districts"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

"
Global Distribution

Continental Asia, Malesia and Australia

Indian distribution

State - Kerala, District/s: Kottayam, Alappuzha, Kasaragode, Kollam, Idukki, Pathanamthitta, Thiruvananthapuram, Malappuram, Kozhikkode, Wayanad, Kannur, Thrissur, Ernakulam

"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution in Egypt

Nile Valley North of Nubia (Location: Delta), Nubian Desert Oases, Libyan Desert Oases, Mareotic Sector, North Sinai, Nile Valley North of Nubia (Location: Fayium), Isthmic Desert, Galala Desert.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Distribution

Egypt, Palestine, Syria, Turkey, Iraq, tropical Africa.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Hainan, Hunan, Jiangxi, Taiwan, Yunnan, Zhejiang [India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand; widespread in Africa, S and SE Asia, Australia].
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Subtropical Himalaya, India, east to China, Malaysia, Australia.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Herbs perennial, with creeping or floating stems, rooting at nodes, with white, erect, short (1-3 cm), spindle-shaped pneumatophores in clusters at nodes of floating stems. Floating stems to 400 cm, terrestrial stems 20-60 cm, much branched, tips ascending, glabrous or densely villous. Petiole 5-20 mm; leaf blade oblong to spatulate-oblong, 0.4-7 × 0.7-3 cm, glabrous, lateral veins 6-13 per side, submarginal vein not prominent, base narrowly cuneate or attenuate, margin entire, apex obtuse to subacute. Sepals 5, deltoid-acuminate, 5-11 mm, glabrous or villous. Petals creamy-white with yellow base, obovate, 9-18 × 6-10 mm. Stamens 10; filaments white, 2.5-4 mm; anthers 0.7-1.8 mm; pollen in monads. Style white, 4-10 mm, glabrous; stigma discoid. Capsule light brown with dark brown ribs, cylindric, terete, 1.2-2.7 cm, 3-4 mm in diam., glabrous or villous, thickly walled, tardily and irregularly dehiscent; pedicel 1.5-5.5 cm. Seeds in one row per locule, firmly embedded in coherent cubes of woody endocarp fused to capsule wall, pale brown, oblong or elliptic, 1.1-1.3 mm, raphe inconspicuous. Fl. Apr-Nov, fr. May-Nov. 2n = 32*.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Elevation Range

200-600 m
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Size

Height: 20-80 cm.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

"Aquatic floating herbs; aerophores spongy, white coloured, fusiform. Leaves 1.5-3.5 x 0.5-1.5 cm, obovate to oblanceolate, base attenuate, apex obtuse, lower surface glossy. Flowers solitary, axillary, to 4 cm across. Calyx tube c. 1 cm long, pubescent; lobes 5, narrow-lanceolate. Petals 5, obovate, emarginate or rounded at apex, cream coloured or white with an yellowish blotch inside. Stamens 10; filaments subequal. Ovary 5-locular; ovules many; style hairy at base; stigma globose. Capsule c. 2.5 cm long, terete, 10-ribbed, dehiscing by 4-5 valves."
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic

Habit: Herb
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Synonym

Jussiaea adscendens Linnaeus, Syst. Nat., ed. 12, 2: 297; Mant. Pl. 1: 69. 1767; J. repens Linnaeus.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Type Information

Isoneotype for Jussiaea adscendens L.
Catalog Number: US 2794203
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: ; Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): C. Saldanha
Year Collected: 1969
Locality: Hassan District, Mysore. Belur - Gendehally road., Karnataka, India, Asia-Tropical
Microhabitat: In a pond.
  • Isoneotype: Linnaeus, C. 1767. Mantissa Pl. 69.; Raven, P. H. & et al. Order Out of Chaos. 605.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
It is a perennial, floating aquatic, herbaceous plant (Hemicryptophyte) that is found in lakes, shallow waters, ditches and rivers, sometimes in very high densities. Flowering occurs during spring and autumn. It can incorporate large amounts of heavy metals.

Systems
  • Freshwater
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Range and Habitat in Illinois

Creeping Water Primrose is locally common and native to southern Illinois, while in the rest of the state it is uncommon and probably adventive in most areas (see Distribution Map). This species is slowly spreading northward. Habitats include borders of ponds, shallow areas of lakes, sluggish streams, swamps, marshes, and ditches. In some of these habitats, Creeping Water Primrose can become the dominant shoreline plant, forming large colonies.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

General Habitat

Ponds and ditches
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Canals and ditches.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wet swampy places, flooded rice paddies, often floating in water at edges of ponds, tanks, ditches; near sea level to 1600 m.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

Flower-Visiting Insects of Creeping Primrose in Illinois

Ludwigia peploides glabresens (Creeping Primrose)
(an older scientific name for this plant is Jussiaea repens; bees suck nectar or collect pollen, wasps and skippers suck nectar only, while Syrphid flies feed on pollen; wasps and some bees are effective pollinators of the flowers; observations are from Estes & Thorp; Lasioglossum nelumbonis was described as a collector of pollen by the authors, but this oligolectic bee requires pollen from very different plant species)

Bees (long-tongued)
Apidae (Apinae): Apis mellifera sn cp; Anthophoridae (Eucerini): Svastra cressonii sn cp fq

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Agapostemon melliventris sn cp fq, Augochlorella striata sn cp fq, Lasioglossum spp. sn cp fq np, Lasioglossum lustrans sn np fq, Lasioglossum nelumbonis sn np

Wasps
Vespidae (Eumeninae): Euodynerus hidalgo sn

Flies
Syrphidae: Eristalis sp. fp np, Toxomerus sp. fp np; Muscidae: Unidentified sp. fp np

Skippers
Hesperiidae: Atalopedes campestris sn np, Lerodea eufala sn np

Beetles
Chrysomelidae: Altica sp. np

Katydids
Tettigoniidae: Unidentified sp. (nymphs) fp np

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Faunal Associations

The flowers are cross-pollinated primarily by bees, including honeybees, digger bees (Eucerine), and Halictid bees. Other visitors, such as flies and skippers, are less effective at cross-pollination. These insects obtain nectar and/or pollen from the flowers. Some insects feed destructively on Creeping Water Primrose. This includes the flea beetles, Altica litigata and Lysathia ludoviciana, and a leafhopper, Draeculacephala inscripta. The Mallard and possibly other ducks feed on the seed capsules. Because of the large dense colonies that this plant often forms, it provides good cover along shorelines for various insects, frogs, and other wetland wildlife. Photographic Location
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population Biology

Frequency

Common
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering and fruiting: Throughout the year
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Life Expectancy

Perennial.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Bibliotheca Alexandrina

Source: Bibliotheca Alexandrina - EOL Ar

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Ludwigia stolonifera

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2014

Assessor/s
Kavak, S.

Reviewer/s
Lansdown, R.V. & Smith, K.

Contributor/s
Rhazi, M., Grillas, P., Flanagan, D. & Rhazi, L.

Justification
This species is classified as Least Concern due to its widespread distribution, stable populations and lack of major threats.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
The species is present in numerous locations in the Mediterranean basin as well as in North Africa and the populations appear to be stable. In Libya, it is found at at least eight locations distributed along the rivers around Tripoli and Al Khums. In Egypt, it is known from at least 11 locations distributed between the Nile delta, the western Desert oases, the Mediterranean coastline and the Sinai Peninsula. It is fairly common in the west of Syria and Lebanon. In Israel, it occurs at more than 30 sites. In Turkey, it is known from five localities in the south.

Population Trend
Stable
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
There are no widespread threats to this species. However, in Israel, at least 30% of the sites have become destroyed by drainage and mechanical construction since the 1960s but it still occurs at more than 30 sites.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no conservation measures in place but it is recommended to monitor the existing sites, to estimate the population size, and to study the dynamics of the populations.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

The preference is full sun, wet conditions, and muddy soil, although this plant can adapt to shallow water as a floating aquatic. Creeping Water Primrose (Ludwigia peploides glabrescens) can spread aggressively in shallow wetlands and muddy areas. It is potentially invasive.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© John Hilty

Source: Illinois Wildflowers

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Uses

Medicinal
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

The plant is used medicinally for its febrifugal and antiswelling properties.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!