Physical Description

Morphology

Sexual Dimorphism

Females larger in most turtles and snakes, but males larger in most lizards and crododilians; extreme Sexual Dimorphism in larger pythons where females may weigh more than 10 times as much as males; Sexual Dimorphism also in body shape, tail length, head size, color, scales, and crests.
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Source: Fairbairn, 2013

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Ecology

Associations

Animal / dung saprobe
Basidiobolus ranarum is saprobic in/on dung or excretions of dung of Reptilia

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Known predators

Reptilia is prey of:
Thamnophis sirtalis
Diadophis punctatus
Lampropeltis triangulum
Agkistrodon piscivorus
Butorides virescens
Egretta thula
Eudocimus ruber
Buteo lineatus
Pandion haliaetus
Falco biarmicus
Herpetotheres cachinnans
Otus asio
Otus trichopsis
Micrathene whitneyi
Strix varia
Agelaius phoeniceus
Corvus corax
Corvus caurinus
Catharus guttatus
Spermophilus lateralis
Tamias dorsalis
Tamias merriami
Onychomys arenicola
Mustela vison
Bassariscus astutus
Nasua nasua
Panthera onca
Cerdocyon thous
Otocyon megalotis
Alligator mississippiensis
Paleosuchus trigonatus
Didelphis albiventris
Dasycercus cristicauda
Dasyurus maculatus
Planigale tenuirostris
Oncifelis geoffroyi
Prionailurus viverrinus
Ardea alba
Asturina nitida
Ictinia mississippiensis
Cacatua alba
Leontopithecus chrysopygus
Leontopithecus caissara
Papio hamadryas
Hylobates klossii
Heloderma horridum
Pseudalopex griseus
Pseudalopex gymnocercus
Pseudalopex vetulus
Vulpes chama
Oreailurus jacobita
Galidia elegans
Mungotictis decemlineata
Bdeogale nigripes
Crossarchus obscurus
Herpestes edwardsii
Herpestes ichneumon
Suricata suricatta
Lutrogale perspicillata
Melogale everetti
Melogale personata
Conepatus semistriatus
Galictis cuja
Ictonyx striatus
Mustela altaica
Mustela putorius
Bassaricyon gabbii
Chaetophractus villosus
Solenodon cubanus
Limnogale mergulus
Hemiechinus aethiopicus
Crocidura leucodon
Plecotus austriacus
Macroderma gigas
Megaderma lyra
Prionailurus iriomotensis
Canis lupus dingo
Canis lupus familiaris
Papio anubis
Papio ursinus

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
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Known prey organisms

Reptilia preys on:
Arthropoda
Gallicolumba luzonica
Meriones crassus
Sorex araneus

Based on studies in:
USA: California, Coachella Valley (Desert or dune)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 16, 2011 at http://animaldiversity.org. http://www.animaldiversity.org
  • Polis GA (1991) Complex desert food webs: an empirical critique of food web theory. Am Nat 138:123–155
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Evolution and Systematics

Functional Adaptations

Functional adaptation

Organs detect scent: reptiles
 

The tongues of many reptiles help detect odors by gathering scent particles and transferring them to a chemoreceptor organ.

     
  "Many snakes and reptiles combine the senses of smell and taste. When a snake flicks its forked tongue in and out of its mouth, it is sampling the air. The snake does not even need to open its mouth to do this. The tongue is flicked out through a small hole in the snake's lips, so its two slender forks can collect scent particles from the air or from an object such as a stone. Back inside the mouth, the tongue's forks are pressed into a pair of domed pits in the roof of the mouth, which have a moist lining that is sensitive to the chemicals it has picked up. The olfactory particles are transferred to the pits, which are well supplied with nerve endings, and are collectively known as Jacobson's organ. Although most often found in snakes, this organ is also common in other reptiles, especially terrestrial lizards." (Shuker 2001:31)
  Learn more about this functional adaptation.
  • Shuker, KPN. 2001. The Hidden Powers of Animals: Uncovering the Secrets of Nature. London: Marshall Editions Ltd. 240 p.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:12397
Specimens with Sequences:11664
Specimens with Barcodes:9341
Species:2405
Species With Barcodes:2071
Public Records:7423
Public Species:1134
Public BINs:2076
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Barcode data

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