Overview

Brief Summary

Pond cypress (Taxodium distichum var. imbricarium) is a deciduous conifer tree.  It is native to the southeastern United States from Virginia to Florida and west to eastern Louisiana.  Pond cypress occurs mainly in shallow ponds, lake margins, swamps, blackwater rivers and wetlands.  It prefers wet, poorly drained and acidic soils, at low altitudes along the Gulf and Atlantic coastal plains.  The taxonomic relationship between pond cypress and bald cypress is controversial and some literature uses the scientific name Taxodium ascendens for pond cypress; see note below.

Pond cypress trees grow to an average height of 15–18 m (49–59 ft).  The trunk expands at the base, anchoring the tree in the muddy soils in inhabits.  When submerged or growing in waterlogged soil, the roots send up growths called “cypress knees” that rise up out of the ground or water to 1 meter (3 feet) above the roots.  These woody snorkel-like structures (technically called “pneumatophores,”) help the roots to get carbon dioxide and release oxygen to the atmosphere when the waterlogged soil restricts such exchange.  This makes the pond cypress very flood tolerant. 

These large trees have 0.5-2 cm (0.2-0.8 inch) long needle-like leaves that grow in a spiral around the shoots.  In the northern part of their range the trees lose their leaves in winter (deciduous), but further south they are evergreen.  The flowers are monoecious, meaning trees produce male pollen-bearing catkins separate from the female cones.  The catkins shed their pollen in early spring to fertilize the round, 2.5 cm- (1 inch-) diameter cones.  One or two seeds adhere to the triangular scales that make up the cones.  Cones contain up to 30 seeds.  In October-December, the mature scales, or sometimes the whole cone, fall to the ground and are disseminated by animals or flood waters.  New trees can grow by germination of seeds, or from shoots off the stump of a parent tree (these vegetative shoots are more viable when they sprout from young parent trees than older parents). 

Pond cypress trees live for more than 1000 years.  One of the largest (and presumably oldest, although its age is unknown) grew to 35 meters (106 feet) tall in Big Tree Park, Florida before it was burned down in 2012. 

Pond cypress trees are the dominant trees in cypress dome swamps (the most common type of swamp in Florida).  These woody wetland ecosystems form in stagnant, acidic water-filled depressions along the Gulf Coast and Southern Atlantic plains. They are “dome shaped” because the trees in the middle of the depression grow more vigorously than those around the outside.  Cypress dome swamps harbor a diversity of vegetation as well as fauna, including many threatened and endangered species. 

Pond cypress trees are a valuable timber tree.  Their wood contains a chemical called cypressene that acts as a natural preservative and very resistant to rot and termites.  Older trees accumulate more cypressene and are more resistant than second-growth trees.  The "knees" are frequently used for curved pieces in the construction of wooden boats.  Pond cypress was one of the first New World species brought back to England (in 1637). 

NOTE: taxonomically, pond cypress (Taxodium distichum var. imbricarium) and bald cypress (T. distichum var. distichum) are classified as two varieties of the species distichum rather than as a distinct species in their own right, since they overlap in their geographical distribution and hybridize with each other.  However bald and pond cypress are ecologically distinct, and for this reason some recognize these taxa with species level distinction: T. ascendens (pond cypress) and T. distichum (bald cypress).  In popular use the variety is often named "imbricarium" rather than "imbricatum."

(Earle, 2015; NatureServe 2015; Wikipedia 8 December 2015 a,b,c)

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Comprehensive Description

Taxodium ascendens Brongn.

Distribution

Wet pine savannas (WLPS, VWLPS), ditches, borrow pits.

Notes

Frequent. Mar–Apr ; Oct. Thornhill 474 (NCSC). Specimens seen in the vicinity: Sandy Run [Neck]: Wilbur 53703 (DUKE!); Sandy Run [ O’Berry ]: Taggart SARU 245 (WNC!). [= RAB; = Taxodium distichum L. var. imbricarium (Nutt.) Croom sensu FNA; = Weakley]

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Plazi

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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

Tree, Deciduous, Evergreen, Monoecious, Habit erect, Trees with knees, Tree with bark rough or scaly, Young shoots in flat sprays, Young shoots 3-dimensional, Buds not resinous, Leaves needle-like, Leaves alternate, Needle-like leaf margins entire (use magnification), Needle-like leaf margins finely serrulate (use magnification or slide your finger along the leaf), Leaf apex acute, Leaf apex obtuse, Leaves < 5 cm long, Leaves < 10 cm long, Leaves not blue-green, Scale leaves without raised glands, Needle-like leaves flat, Needle-like leaves not twisted, Needle-like leaves per fascicle mostly 1, Twigs glabrous, Twigs not viscid, Twigs without peg-like projections or large fascicles after needles fall, Berry-like cones orange, Woody seed cones < 5 cm long, Bracts of seed cone included, Seeds tan, Seeds brown, Seeds wingless.
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Stephen C. Meyers

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Taxodium ascendens

Taxodium ascendens, also known as Pond Cypress, is a deciduous conifer of the genus Taxodium, native to North America. Many botanists treat it as a variety of Bald Cypress, Taxodium distichum (as T. distichum var. imbricarium) rather than as a distinct species, but it differs in ecology, occurring mainly in still blackwater rivers, ponds and swamps without silt-rich flood deposits. It predominates in cypress dome habitats.

Description[edit]

Taxodium ascendens reaches on average 15–18 metres (49–59 ft) in height. Compared to T. distichum, the leaves are shorter (3–10 mm long), slenderer and are on shoots that tend to be erect rather than spreading. The trunk is expanded at the base, even on young trees, assisting the tree in anchoring in the soft, muddy soil. The cones also tend to be smaller, not over 2.5 cm diameter. The bark is also a paler gray color. Like Bald Cypresses, Pond Cypresses growing in water have a characteristic growth trait called cypress knees; these are woody projections pneumatophores sent above the water from the roots, probably enabling this plant to breathe air in habitat with waterlogged soil. Maximum longevity of this plant is estimated at 1000 years. This figure may be an underestimate, as The Senator, until recently growing in Longwood, Florida's Big Tree Park, was estimated to be over 3,400 years old.

Distribution[edit]

This species is native to the southeastern United States, from southeastern Virginia to southeastern Louisiana and south into Florida except for the Florida Keys.

Stunted individuals of pond cypress are notable in the Dwarf cypress savanna of the Everglades National Park.

Habitat[edit]

Taxodium ascendens in the Black Water, Okefenokee Swamp, Georgia, USA

Taxodium ascendens occurs naturally in shallow ponds, lake margins, swamps and wetlands. It prefers wet, poorly drained and acidic soils, at an altitude of 0–30 metres (0–98 ft) above sea level.

References[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:The_Senator_Tree_Longwood_Florida.JPG

External links[edit]

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