Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species is endemic to Cuba (Simmons 2005), mostly on the east-central region (Mancina 2012).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is poorly known. It is insectivorous (Nowak 1999). It is found in Cuban dry forests (McGinley 2007), as well as in disturbed habitats and secondary forests (Mancina pers. comm.). It is partially associated with the palm Copernicia gigas for diurnal roosts (Mancina 2012). Also, it uses man-made edifications for roosts, but might be less successful than other sympatric species, like Molossus molossus.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
VU
Vulnerable

Red List Criteria
B2ab(ii,iii)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2015

Assessor/s
Mancina, C.

Reviewer/s
Solari, S.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is listed as Vulnerable. Although its extent of occurrence (EOO) is greater than 60,000 km2, its area of occupancy (AOO) is less than 2,000 km2, and there is a continuing decline in the extent and quality of its forest habitat. There is a best estimate of 10 locations (range of 10-15) based on the threats of habitat loss and degradation. This is an island endemic species, which is a partially specialized on only one palm tree species for its persistence (Mancina et al. 2007); although it might use human made structures as diurnal roosts, it must compete with other molossids for these.

History
  • Vulnerable (VU)
  • 1996
    Vulnerable (VU)
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Population

Population
This species is really abundant, with more than 1,000 individuals per colony (Mancina pers. comm.).

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats
Habitat loss and human induced degradation are the primary threats to this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
The recommended conservation action is to avoid habitat loss. Research is needed regarding the population, threats and habitats.
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Wikipedia

Little goblin bat

The little goblin bat (Mormopterus minutus) is a species of bat in the family Molossidae, the free-tailed bats. It is endemic to Cuba.[1]

This bat is vulnerable due to habitat loss and degradation.[1] During the day it can be found roosting in the palm tree Copernicia gigas and in human-made structures.[2] It hunts insects using echolocation, emitting a variable pattern of calls.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Mancina, C. & Silva, G. 2008. Mormopterus minutus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. Downloaded on 24 March 2015.
  2. ^ Mancina, C., et al. (2007). Endemics under threat: an assessment of the conservation status of Cuban bats. Hystrix, the Italian Journal of Mammalogy 18(1) 3-15.
  3. ^ Mora, E. C., et al. (2011). Plasticity in the echolocation inventory of Mormopterus minutus (Chiroptera, Molossidae). Acta Chiropterologica 13(1), 179-87.
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