Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description of the Bee Mite Species

Notes. Sibling species of C. grandior.
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Bee-Associated Mite Web

Source: Bee-Associated Mites of the World

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Biology of the Bee Mite Species

Deutonymph are found phoretic in circular metasomal acarinaria on the lateral margins of metasomal tergites 3 and 4. Houston (1987) gives a detailed biological account of "C. longirostris" (which may partially include C. grandior).
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Bee-Associated Mite Web

Source: Bee-Associated Mites of the World

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Description of the Bee Mite Species

Notes. Sibling species of C. longirostris.
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Bee-Associated Mite Web

Source: Bee-Associated Mites of the World

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Distribution

Distribution of the Bee Mite Species

Australia: Western Australia (type locality).
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Bee-Associated Mite Web

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Ecology

Associations

Host Associations of the Bee Mite Species

Ctenocolletes nicholsoni (Cockerell, 1929) (type host); Ctenocolletes centralis Houston, 1983
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Host Associations of the Bee Mite Species

Ctenocolletes centralis Houston, 1983 (type host).; Ctenocolletes nicholsoni (Cockerell, 1929)
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Bee-Associated Mite Web

Source: Bee-Associated Mites of the World

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Known predators

Acaridae (Acarid sp.) is prey of:
Arthrocnodax
Anystidae
Philonthus cruentatus
Aleochara bipustulata
Aleochara
Hyponigrus obsidianus

Based on studies in:
USA: California, Southern California (Galls, Plant substrate)
USA: New York (Dung)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
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Known prey organisms

Acaridae (Acarid sp.) preys on:
Atriplex canescens
Atriplex polycarpa
toad carrion
Sarcophaga
Ravinia lherminieri
Musca autumnalis
dung
Sepsis neocynipsea
Sepsis
Saltella sphondylii

Based on studies in:
USA: California, Southern California (Galls, Plant substrate)
Costa Rica: Guanacaste (Carrion substrate)
USA: New York (Dung)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:25
Specimens with Sequences:14
Specimens with Barcodes:12
Species:6
Species With Barcodes:4
Public Records:11
Public Species:4
Public BINs:5
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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Acaridae

The Acaridae are a family of mites. Common forms include some mold mites, for example the grain mite. Genera in the family include:[1]

Fagacarinae Fain & R. A. Norton, 1979
Acarinae Nesbitt, 1945
Rhizoglyphinae Zakhvatkin, 1941
Pontoppidaniinae Oudemans, 1925
Incertae sedis

References[edit]

  1. ^ Barry O'Connor, ed. (2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Archived from the original on 7 August 2010. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
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