Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs from the Gulf of California south to southern Ecuador including the offshore islands (Tenorio et al. 2012).
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Physical Description

Type Information

Holotype for Conus scariphus Dall, 1910
Catalog Number: USNM 123085
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Invertebrate Zoology
Preparation: Dry
Collector(s): United States Fish Commission
Year Collected: 1891
Locality: Cocos Island, Costa Rica, North Pacific Ocean
Depth (m): 121 to 121
Vessel: Albatross R/V
  • Holotype: Dall, W. H. 1910. Proc. U.S. Natl. Mus. 38(1741): 225.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This is a deepwater species that lives from 20-150 m in muddy sand bottoms. Adults will grow to approx. 70 mm but will typically be less than this (Tenorio et al. 2012)

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Tenorio, M.J.

Reviewer/s
Coltro, J., Peters, H. & Petuch, E.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species occurs from the Gulf of California south to southern Ecuador including the offshore islands (Tenorio et al. 2012). There are no known threats. This species is listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
There are no population data available in the literature for this species.
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no known threats to this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no known conservation measures currently in place for this species.
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Wikipedia

Conus emarginatus

Conasprella emarginata is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[1]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these cone snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

Description[edit]

Distribution[edit]

Bahía Magdalena, Baja California Sur, through most of Golfo de California, Mexico. South to Peru. It has also been reported from Islas Galapagos.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bouchet, P. (2015). Conasprella emarginata (Reeve, 1844). Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=835894 on 2015-03-20
  2. ^ Tenorio M.J., Tucker J.K. & Chaney H.W. (2012). The Families Conilithidae and Conidae. The Cones of the Eastern Pacific. In: Poppe G.T. & Groh K. (eds): A Conchological Iconography. Hackenheim: ConchBooks. 112 pp., 88 pls.
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