Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description of Foraminiferida

Granuloreticulosea, with shells (loricae); among the more abundant and most conspicuous protozoa in most marine and brackish water habitats; shells may be durable and are an important component of marine sediments and fossilize well; good geological record extending back to the Cambrian, planktonic more commonly benthic; large protozoa (range 60 µm-12 cm), life-spans often proportional to their sizes (days-years); some monothalamic species reproduce by binary fission, budding, or cytotomy; most have complex life cycles, involving both sexual and asexual reproduction; there may be morphological differences between the sexual (gamont) and asexual (agamont, schizont) phases of the life cycles; the materials used in the test (e.g. organic, agglutinated, various types of mineralized calcareous), the geometry of chambers (in multichambered species) and their construction, the form of the aperture(s) are some of the important characters used in foraminiferan identification and classification.; planktonic foraminifera are often hosts for endosymbiotic algae.
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Ecology

Associations

Known predators

Foraminifera (Foraminifera (Formaifera??)) is prey of:
Paralichthyes albigutta
Strongylura marina
Urophycis floridana
Prionotus scitulus
Prionotus tribulus
Gobiosoma robustum
Microgobius gulosus
Lagodon rhomboides
Leiostomus xanthurus
Syngnathus scovelli
Hippocampus zosterae
Laridae
Cyprinodon variegatus
Anatidae
Fundulus confluentus
Fundulus similis
Adinia xenica
suspended particulate carbon
Sabellidae
Serpulidae
Zoarces viviparus
Pomatoschistus minutus
Pomatoschistus microps
Pleuronectes platessa
Platichthys flesus
Crangon crangon
Retusa obtusa

Based on studies in:
USA: Florida (Estuarine)
Scotland (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Christian RR, Luczkovich JJ (1999) Organizing and understanding a winter’s seagrass foodweb network through effective trophic levels. Ecol Model 117:99–124
  • Hall SJ, Raffaelli D (1991) Food-web patterns: lessons from a species-rich web. J Anim Ecol 60:823–842
  • Huxham M, Beany S, Raffaelli D (1996) Do parasites reduce the chances of triangulation in a real food web? Oikos 76:284–300
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Known prey organisms

Foraminifera (Foraminifera (Formaifera??)) preys on:
phytoplankton
bacterioplankton
Microprotozoa
POM

Based on studies in:
USA: Florida (Estuarine)
Scotland (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Christian RR, Luczkovich JJ (1999) Organizing and understanding a winter’s seagrass foodweb network through effective trophic levels. Ecol Model 117:99–124
  • Hall SJ, Raffaelli D (1991) Food-web patterns: lessons from a species-rich web. J Anim Ecol 60:823–842
  • Huxham M, Beany S, Raffaelli D (1996) Do parasites reduce the chances of triangulation in a real food web? Oikos 76:284–300
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

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