Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Description

Chiefly marine (coastal) and brackish water. Some in freshwater. Distribution: all tropical and temperate seas. Spinous and soft dorsal fins widely separate, the former with 4 spines. Pelvic fins subabdominal. One spine in pelvic fin; soft rays 5. Lateral line hardly visible when present. Mouth of moderate size. Toothless or teeth small. Long gill rakers. Muscular stomach; extremely long intestine. Vertebrae 24-26. About 0.9 m maximum length.
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© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Ecology

Associations

Known predators

Mugilidae (mullet) is prey of:
Salmonidae
Carangidae
Sciaenops ocellatus
Chondrichthyes
Tursiops truncatus

Based on studies in:
USA: Florida (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Known prey organisms

Mugilidae (mullet) preys on:
producers
detritus

Based on studies in:
USA: Florida (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:1937
Specimens with Sequences:1459
Specimens with Barcodes:1323
Species:108
Species With Barcodes:103
Public Records:907
Public Species:84
Public BINs:108
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Mullet (fish)

This article is about the fish of the family Mugilidae. For other fish called "mullets", see Red mullet and Mullidae. For other uses, see Mullet (disambiguation).

The mullets or grey mullets are a family (Mugilidae) and order of ray-finned fish found worldwide in coastal temperate and tropical waters, and in some species in fresh water.[1] Mullets have served as an important source of food in Mediterranean Europe since Roman times. The family includes about 80 species in 17 genera, although half of the species are in just two genera (Liza and Mugil).

Mullets are distinguished by the presence of two separate dorsal fins, small triangular mouths, and the absence of a lateral line organ. They feed on detritus, and most species have unusually muscular stomachs and a complex pharynx to help in digestion.[1]

Classification and naming[edit]

Taxonomically, the family is currently treated as the sole member of the order Mugiliformes, but as Nelson[2] says, "there has been much disagreement concerning the relationships" of this family. The presence of fin spines clearly indicates membership in the superorder Acanthopterygii, and in the 1960s, they were classed as primitive perciforms,[3] while others have grouped them in Atheriniformes[citation needed].

In North America, "mullet" by itself usually refers to Mugilidae. In Europe, the word "mullet" is usually qualified, the "grey mullets" being Mugilidae and the "red mullets" or "surmullets" being Mullidae, notably members of the genus Mullus, the red mullets. Outside Europe, the Mullidae are often called "goatfish". Fish with common names including the word "mullet" may be a member of one family or the other, or even unrelated such as the freshwater white sucker (Catostomus commersonii).

Mullets in the Mediterranean Sea

Timeline[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Johnson, G.D. & Gill, A.C. (1998). Paxton, J.R. & Eschmeyer, W.N., ed. Encyclopedia of Fishes. San Diego: Academic Press. p. 192. ISBN 0-12-547665-5. 
  2. ^ "Fishes of the World, 4th Edition". Wiley. Retrieved 2012-04-12. 
  3. ^ Gosline, W. A. (1961) "The Perciform Caudal Skeleton" Copeia 1961(3): pp. 265-270

External links[edit]

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