Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Spiny (in ours) shrubs or small trees. Leaves 2-pinnate, the rhachilla spinescent. Stipules (in ours) spinescent. Inflorescence an axillary raceme. Sepals 5. Petals 5, ± equal but upper one larger and longer clawed. Stamens 10, Pod indehiscent.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:33
Specimens with Sequences:34
Specimens with Barcodes:34
Species:10
Species With Barcodes:10
Public Records:25
Public Species:10
Public BINs:0
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Parkinsonia

"Paloverde" redirects here. For other uses, see Paloverde (disambiguation).
For the ammonite genus Parkinsonia, see Parkinsonia (ammonite)

Parkinsonia /ˌpɑrkɨnˈsniə/, also Cercidium /sərˈsɪdiəm/,[3] is a genus of flowering plants in the pea family, Fabaceae. It contains about 12 species that are native to semi-desert regions of Africa and the Americas. The name of the genus honors English apothecary and botanist John Parkinson (1567–1650).[4]

They are large shrubs or small trees growing to 5–12 m (16–39 ft) tall, dry season deciduous, with sparse, open, thorny crowns and green bark. The leaves are pinnate, sometimes bipinnate, with numerous small leaflets; they are only borne for a relatively short time after rains, with much of the photosynthesis carried out by the green twigs and branches. The flowers are symmetrical or nearly so, with five yellow or white petals. The fruit is a pod containing several seeds.

Most American species are known by the common name of palo verde or paloverde, from the Spanish words meaning "green pole" or "green stick". This name is derived from its characteristic green trunk. The palo verde (not species-specific) is the state tree of Arizona.[5]

Selected species[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Parkinsonia L.". TROPICOS. Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  2. ^ "Genus: Parkinsonia L.". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 2000-04-07. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  3. ^ Sunset Western Garden Book, 1995:606–607
  4. ^ Quattrocchi, Umberto (2000). CRC World Dictionary of Plant Names: Common Names, Scientific Names, Eponyms, Synonyms, and Etymology. III: M-Q. p. 1966. ISBN 978-0-8493-2673-8. 
  5. ^ "Arizona State Tree". Retrieved 2014-03-21. 
  6. ^ "GRIN Species records of Parkinsonia". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2011-04-25. 
  7. ^ "Subordinate taxa of Parkinsonia L.". TROPICOS. Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved 2010-02-11. 
  8. ^ "Parkinsonia". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 2011-04-25. 
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Parkinsonia (ammonite)

Parkinsonia is a genus of ammonites belonging to the family Parkinsoniidae.[2]

These fast-moving nektonic carnivores lived during from the Bajocian age to the Bathonian age of the Middle Jurassic.[3]

Description[edit]

Parkinsonia species have a compressed spiral shell with strong ribbing.[4][5]

Distribution[edit]

Fossils of species within this genus have been found in the Jurassic of France, Germany, Iran, Russia, United Kingdom, and United States.[1]

References[edit]

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