Overview

Comprehensive Description

GNAPHOSIDAEAraneaeArachnidaArthropodaAnimalia

GNAPHOSIDAE

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GnaphosidaeAnimalia

Gnaphosidae Pocock, 1898

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Hoeksema, Bert W.

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GNAPHOSIDAEAraneaeArachnidaArthropodaAnimalia

GNAPHOSIDAE

Public Domain

Plazi

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GnaphosidaeAnimalia

Gnaphosidae Pocock, 1898

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Hoeksema, Bert W.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:1819
Specimens with Sequences:1589
Specimens with Barcodes:1535
Species:189
Species With Barcodes:167
Public Records:448
Public Species:46
Public BINs:55
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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Ground spider

Ground spiders (family Gnaphosidae) include nearly 2,000 described species in over 100 genera, distributed worldwide. This makes the family the seventh largest known. New species are still being discovered. They are closely related to Clubionidae.[1]

Common genera include Gnaphosa, Drassodes, Micaria, Cesonia, Zelotes and many others.

There are 105 species known to central Europe.[2]

Description[edit source | edit]

Generally, ground spiders are characterized by having barrel-shaped anterior spinnerets that are one spinneret diameter apart. The main exception to this rule is found in the ant-mimicking genus Micaria. Another characteristic is an indentation in the endites (paired mouthparts anterior and lateral to the labium, or lip). All ground spiders lack a prey-capture web and generally run prey down on the surface. They hunt at night and spend the day in a silken retreat.[1] The thick-walled egg sacs are guarded by the mother until the spiderlings hatch.[1]

Human interaction[edit source | edit]

At present, no ground spiders are known to be seriously venomous to humans.

Images[edit source | edit]

See also[edit source | edit]

Footnotes[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ a b c Nieuwenhuys 2000
  2. ^ Blick, T. et al. (2004).Checklist of the spiders of Central Europe. (Arachnida: Araneae). Version 1. Dezember 2004. (PDF)

References[edit source | edit]

  • Platnick, N.I. & Shadab, M.U. (1983): A revision of the American spiders of the genus Zelotes (Araneae, Gnaphosidae). Bulletin of the AMNH 174: 99-191. PDF (29Mb) - Abstract
  • Ed Nieuwenhuys (2000): Spiders of NW-Europe Retrieved Jan 3, 2007. (with color pictures of some species)
  • Platnick, Norman I. (2007): The world spider catalog, version 8.0. American Museum of Natural History.
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