Overview

Comprehensive Description

AMAUROBIIDAEAraneaeArachnidaArthropodaAnimalia

AMAUROBIIDAE

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AmaurobiidaeAnimalia

Amaurobiidae Thorell, 1870

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Hoeksema, Bert W.

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AMAUROBIIDAEAraneaeArachnidaArthropodaAnimalia

AMAUROBIIDAE

Public Domain

Plazi

Source: Plazi.org

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AmaurobiidaeAnimalia

Amaurobiidae Thorell, 1870

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Hoeksema, Bert W.

Source: Plazi.org

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:597
Specimens with Sequences:558
Specimens with Barcodes:552
Species:37
Species With Barcodes:34
Public Records:180
Public Species:20
Public BINs:14
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Amaurobiidae

Pimus sp.

The Amaurobiidae are three-clawed cribellate or ecribellate spiders found in most parts of the world and difficult to distinguish from related spiders in other families, especially Agelenidae, Desidae and Amphinectidae. Their intra- and interfamilial relationships are contentious. In Spider Families of the World, 2007, they were represented by 69 genera and about 640 species in 5 subfamilies.

Coras sp., probably medicinalis

In Australia they are small to medium-sized entelgyne spiders with generous sheet webs across the floor of rainforests. They generally have eight similar eyes in two conservatively curved rows. They often have a calamistrum on metatarsus IV associated with a cribellum. Australian Amaurobiids may be distinguished from Amphinectidae by the absence of a pre-tarsal fracture and the presence of a retrocoxal hymen on coxa I.[1]

References [edit]

  1. ^ [1] Spiders of Australia
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