David Eickhoff

Native Hawaiian Plant Specialist

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  • Profile picture of tony rebelo who took this action.

    tony rebelo commented on "EOL Curators":

    The loss of the apostrophe is common as words become more commonplace. There are bird examples - I remember - but cannot call them to mind now. But around Cape Town (Cape's Town) we have Devils Peak, Lions Head, Sir Lowrys* Pass, Bettys* Bay, St Sebastian Bay, Jeffreys Bay, Gordons* Bay, Mitchells Plain, Simonstown (or Simons* Town) , Plettenberg Bay , Prince Alfred Hamlet (*on some/many maps still with apostrophe) and so on. So the loss of the apostrophe and the "s" is an ongoing process, although I will concede that the apostrophe is lost easier when the "s" is also dropped - where the "s" is retained many seem to think like you that it cannot just be an s as that implies plural and hence must be aspostrophed.

    almost 4 years ago • edited: almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of Donald Hobern who took this action.

    Donald Hobern commented on "EOL Curators":

    Hi Tony - I'm intrigued by your comment on Burchell(')s Coucal. The form without an apostrophe makes no sense at all to me in English. The only sense I can make of the name is that it is a Coucal that is associated with (not necessarily owned by) Burchell. English uses the possessive apostrophe-s to indicate this. The English s-without-an-apostrophe is good for plurals but not this case. I recognise that other languages (Afrikaans?) use s-without-an-apostrophe for the possessive, but I don't see how that would help you. So, in short, does "Burchells Coucal" mean something specific to you that is different from "Burchell's Coucal" and how? All the best, Donald

    almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of tony rebelo who took this action.

    tony rebelo commented on "EOL Curators":

    I think you are muddling Common Names with Official Names. What I have said applies to all common names. Official Names are lists of standardized common names set up by some committee or group for standardization. Those are a small subset of common names used by people, and in my opinion reduced the diversity and richness of common names - if we really need a standard list, well we have the scientific names. Some of what you say is correct. If people are using Greater Crested Grebe, who are we to say it should be Great Crest Grebe? Although I would say that Burchell's Coucal is a typological error for Burchells Coucal. So please: Strawberry Bush and Hearts-a-bustin-with-love is great, but remember the capital letters. (Heartsabustinwithlove is too extreme and Hearts Abusting With Love is ridiculous). Part of my problem is that I also speak Afrikaans, which apart from being phonetic tends to have a oneword approach to objects, so words like Heartsabustinwithlove are second nature to me (the phonetics is important as words like Whiteeye are almost never a problem in Afrikaans, so hyphens are rare).

    almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of Steve Baskauf who took this action.

    Steve Baskauf commented on "EOL Curators":

    Well, what you are saying makes sense. However, one's position on this issue depends somewhat on what one believes about the purpose of providing common names in a reference. If one believes that a centralized body should decide on the proper common names for species and that everyone should use those names (e.g. as is generally the case for bird species where a governing body puts out a list of standardized common names), then perhaps your approach should be adopted. On the other hand, if one believes that the purpose of listing common names is to report what people actually call the taxon, then it doesn't really matter what we think is the most sensible way to list a name. What matters is how one finds it being used. Unlike birds, there is no centralized body that decides what common names should be used for plants. Subsequently there may be several common names for a single species of plant as well as different regional names. For example, in some places, Euonymus americanus is called "strawberry bush". However, in the area where I live, the most typical common name is "hearts a-bustin' with love" or just "hearts a-bustin' ". How does one render that according to rules? No one has actually appointed Encyclopedia of Life or EOL curators to decide the proper way to render common names.

    almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of tony rebelo who took this action.

    tony rebelo commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Jamie McMillan: I concur. The issue of names being Proper Names or collective names is an issue I too feel strongly about. To my mind a Proper Name: the name that refers specifically to a special species is the same as a persons name: it should be capitalized and cannot be genitive. What is a white green fly? It could be anything. But White Greenfly alerts me immediately that this refers to a special species (or genus) that probably has a scientific name. I go a bit further than you though. Great Crested Grebe is still too descriptive. Why not Greatcrest Grebe if it has a large crest or Great Crest Grebe if it is the larger of a group of Grebes with crests. And certainly it is Burchells Coucal - it is named after Burchell and does not belong to him, so Burchell's Coucal is wrong. But I am amazed at the vehement criticism I get when I vehemently try forcing my views on the matter ..

    almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of cuttersgoose who took this action.

    cuttersgoose commented on "Senna gaudichaudii (Hook. & Arn.) H. S. Irwin & Barneby":

    Beautiful!

    almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of David Eickhoff who took this action.

    David Eickhoff marked "Gouania vitifolia" as unreviewed on the "Gouania hawaiiensis" page.

    almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of David Eickhoff who took this action.

    David Eickhoff marked "Gouania vitifolia" as unreviewed on the "Gouania bishopii" page.

    almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of David Eickhoff who took this action.

    David Eickhoff marked "Gouania vitifolia" as unreviewed on the "Gouania vitifolia" page.

    almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of David Eickhoff who took this action.

    David Eickhoff marked "Vigna o-wahuensis" as unreviewed on the "Vigna o-wahuensis" page.

    almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of David Eickhoff who took this action.

    David Eickhoff marked "Luria tessellata" as unreviewed on the "Luria tessellata" page.

    almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of David Eickhoff who took this action.

    David Eickhoff marked "Luria tessellata" as unreviewed on the "Cypraea tessellata" page.

    almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of David Eickhoff who took this action.

    David Eickhoff marked "Homalocantha anatomica pele" as unreviewed on the "Homalocantha anatomica" page.

    almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of David Eickhoff who took this action.

    David Eickhoff marked "Homalocantha anatomica pele" as unreviewed on the "Murex anatomica" page.

    almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of David Eickhoff who took this action.

    David Eickhoff set "Panicum niihauense" as an exemplar on "Panicum niihauense H. St. John".

    almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of Jamie McMillan who took this action.

    Jamie McMillan commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Michаel Frаnkis: I am a great capital letter fan and have tried to do this in my wildlife travel company http://www.naturalist.co.uk/ (just for ref -not and advert!). But several of my tour leaders are also journalists and it has taken a long time to persuade them to capitalise. My reasoning is that when someone writes 'I saw a little ringed plover' do they mean a small Greater Ringed Plover, a small Ringed Plover whose species they couldn't quite determine, or a species named Little Ringed Plover? Caps make it clear at once. The other big confusion that might have already been mentioned is hyphenation. A Great Crested Grebe means a large grebe with a crest. A Great-crested Grebe would mean a grebe of any size with a large crest. A Great Crested-grebe would mean a large species of a distinctive group of grebes, all with crests. Hope this helps.

    almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of Rachel Berquist who took this action.
    Rachel Berquist joined the community "EOL Curators".

    almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of Jennifer Hammock who took this action.

    Jennifer Hammock commented on "EOL Curators":

    Calling ecologists and conservation biologists with a little time and expertise to spare: our colleagues at the Encyclopedia of Earth are looking for a few good editors. The Encyclopedia of Earth is an electronic reference about the Earth, its natural environments, and their interaction with society. It was an important contributor of material for EOL's new Topics in Biodiversity articles. If you can review articles on broad topics in ecology, conservation biology or environmental science, please register with them as a topic editor. Your work on EoE may also be re-purposed on EOL and other open access venues. Thanks!

    almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of Katja Schulz who took this action.

    Katja Schulz commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Deniz Martinez: A "change image type to map" tool is on our list of features to develop in the future. For now, there's a collection for images that need to be moved to the maps tab. I have made both of you managers of that collection, so you can add images that need to be retagged.

    almost 4 years ago

  • Profile picture of Katerina Tvardikova who took this action.

    Katerina Tvardikova commented on "EOL Curators":

    @Deniz Martinez: Hi, I have the same problem, as I have a mpa of distribution for all birds. I only changed description, and left in in pictures with comment. However, I am not sure whether it is okay.

    almost 4 years ago