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Buddhist Pine

Podocarpus macrophyllus (Thunb.) Sweet

Description

provided by eFloras
Trees to 20 m tall; trunk to 60 cm d.b.h.; bark gray or grayish brown, peeling off in thin flakes; branches spreading or erect-spreading, rather dense; branchlets glabrous or pubescent. Leaves spirally arranged, sessile; blade dark green and glossy adaxially, grayish green, pale green, or tinged white abaxially, linear-lanceolate, oblanceolate, or oblong-oblanceolate, slightly curved, 1.7-12 cm × 2-10 mm, midvein prominently raised adaxially, slightly raised abaxially, base cuneate, apex mucronate or acute to long acuminate. Pollen cones axillary, usually in clusters of 3-5 on very short peduncle, spikelike, 3-5 cm, with several triangular bracts at base. Seed-bearing structures axillary, solitary, pedunculate, with few basal bracts. Receptacle red or purplish red when ripe, columnar. Epimatium purplish black when ripe, with white powder. Seed ovoid, ca. 1 cm in diam., apex rounded. Pollination Apr-May, seed maturity Aug-Sep. 2n = 38.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 4: 83 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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eFloras.org
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Distribution

provided by eFloras
Anhui, Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Sichuan, ?Taiwan, Yunnan, Zhejiang; introduced or status uncertain in Shaanxi [Japan, ?N Myanmar].
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 4: 83 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Habitat

provided by eFloras
Forests, open thickets, roadsides; near sea level to 1000 m.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 4: 83 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Physical Description

provided by USDA PLANTS text
Tree, Evergreen, Dioecious, Habit erect, Trees without or rarely having knees, Tree with bark shaggy or peeling, Young shoots 3-dimensional, Buds not resinous, Leaves needle-like, Leaves alternate, Needle-like leaf margins entire (use magnification), Leaf apex acute, Leaves > 5 cm long, Leaves > 10 cm long, Leaves yellow below, Leaves not blue-green, Scale leaves without raised glands, Needle-like leaves flat, Needle-like leaves not twisted, Needle-like leaf habit erect, Needle-like leaf habit drooping, Needle-like leaves per fascicle mostly 1, Twigs glabrous, Twigs not viscid, Twigs without peg-like projections or large fascicles after needles fall, Seeds within cone, Aril light green, Aril dark green, Berry-like cones reddish, Bracts of seed cone included, Seeds green, Seeds tan, Seeds wingless.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
compiler
Stephen C. Meyers
compiler
Aaron Liston
compiler
Steffi Ickert-Bond
compiler
Damon Little
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USDA PLANTS text

Podocarpus macrophyllus

provided by wikipedia EN

Podocarpus macrophyllus is a conifer in the genus Podocarpus, family Podocarpaceae. It is the northernmost species of the genus, native to southern Japan and southern and eastern China. Common names in English include yew plum pine,[2] Buddhist pine and fern pine. Kusamaki (クサマキ) and inumaki (犬槇) are Japanese names for this tree. In China, it is known as 羅漢松 or luóhàn sōng, which literally means "arhat pine".

 src=
Podocarpus macrophyllus seed cones with two seeds.

It is a small to medium size evergreen tree, reaching 20 m tall.[3] The leaves are strap-shaped, 6–12 cm long, and about 1 cm broad, with a central midrib. The cones are borne on a short stem, and have 2-4 scales, usually only one (sometimes two) fertile, each fertile scale bearing a single apical seed 10–15 mm. When mature, the scales swell up and become reddish purple, fleshy and berry-like, 10–20 mm long; they are then eaten by birds, which disperse the seeds in their droppings.

Podocarpus macrophyllus occurs in forests, open thickets, and roadsides from near sea level to 1000 m.[3]

Symbolism, cultivation and uses

Kusamaki is the state tree of Chiba Prefecture, Japan. It is a popular large shrub or small tree in gardens, particularly in Japan and the southeastern United States. The ripe cone arils are edible, though the seed should not be eaten. Because of its resistance to termites and water, inumaki is used for quality wooden houses in Okinawa Prefecture, Japan.

Buddhist pine is highly regarded as a feng shui tree in Hong Kong, giving it a very high market value. In recent years, the illegal digging of Buddhist pine has become a problem in the city.[4]

This species can be trained as a bonsai.[5]

References

  1. ^ Conifer Specialist Group (1998). "Podocarpus macrophyllus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 1998. Retrieved 15 May 2012.old-form url
  2. ^ "Podocarpus macrophyllus". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 9 October 2015.
  3. ^ a b eFloras. "Podocarpus macrophyllus". Flora of China. Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA. Retrieved 15 April 2012.
  4. ^ "Buddhist pine tree bandit jailed". www.news.gov.hk. Retrieved 30 October 2018.
  5. ^ "Podocarpus Macrophyllus - Bonsai Empire". www.bonsaiempire.com. Retrieved 10 August 2016.

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Podocarpus macrophyllus: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Podocarpus macrophyllus is a conifer in the genus Podocarpus, family Podocarpaceae. It is the northernmost species of the genus, native to southern Japan and southern and eastern China. Common names in English include yew plum pine, Buddhist pine and fern pine. Kusamaki (クサマキ) and inumaki (犬槇) are Japanese names for this tree. In China, it is known as 羅漢松 or luóhàn sōng, which literally means "arhat pine".

 src= Podocarpus macrophyllus seed cones with two seeds.

It is a small to medium size evergreen tree, reaching 20 m tall. The leaves are strap-shaped, 6–12 cm long, and about 1 cm broad, with a central midrib. The cones are borne on a short stem, and have 2-4 scales, usually only one (sometimes two) fertile, each fertile scale bearing a single apical seed 10–15 mm. When mature, the scales swell up and become reddish purple, fleshy and berry-like, 10–20 mm long; they are then eaten by birds, which disperse the seeds in their droppings.

Podocarpus macrophyllus occurs in forests, open thickets, and roadsides from near sea level to 1000 m.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
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wikipedia EN