Description

provided by eFloras
80-150 cm. Leaves broadly linear, 5-10 cm wide. Umbel spherical, 10-14 cm diam., flowers pale lilac or violet. Good for group planting and as a cut flower.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Ornamental Plants From Russia And Adjacent States Of The Former Soviet Union Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Ornamental Plants from Russia and Adjacent States @ eFloras.org
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Tatyana Shulkina
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eFloras.org
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Distribution

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Central Asia (southern regions) and Iran.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Ornamental Plants From Russia And Adjacent States Of The Former Soviet Union Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Ornamental Plants from Russia and Adjacent States @ eFloras.org
editor
Tatyana Shulkina
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Allium giganteum

provided by wikipedia EN

Allium giganteum, common name giant onion, is an Asian species of onion, native to central and southwestern Asia but cultivated in many countries as a flowering garden plant.[4][5] It is the tallest species of Allium in common cultivation, growing to 1.5 metres (4.9 ft).[6]

In early to midsummer, small globes of intense purple umbels appear, followed by attractive fruiting umbels. A popular cultivar, 'Globemaster', is shorter (80 centimetres (31 in)) but produces much larger, deep violet, umbels (15–20 centimetres (5.9–7.9 in)). Both varieties have been granted the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[7][8][9]

In nature, the species is found in Iran, Afghanistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan.[3] In cultivation in the US, it performs well in USDA hardiness zones 6-10.[10]

Eating flowers, seeds, leaves, and stems can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea due to the sulfides they contain.[11]

References

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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Allium giganteum: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Allium giganteum, common name giant onion, is an Asian species of onion, native to central and southwestern Asia but cultivated in many countries as a flowering garden plant. It is the tallest species of Allium in common cultivation, growing to 1.5 metres (4.9 ft).

In early to midsummer, small globes of intense purple umbels appear, followed by attractive fruiting umbels. A popular cultivar, 'Globemaster', is shorter (80 centimetres (31 in)) but produces much larger, deep violet, umbels (15–20 centimetres (5.9–7.9 in)). Both varieties have been granted the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.

In nature, the species is found in Iran, Afghanistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan. In cultivation in the US, it performs well in USDA hardiness zones 6-10.

Eating flowers, seeds, leaves, and stems can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea due to the sulfides they contain.

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Flower opening

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Flower fully open

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
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wikipedia EN