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Brief Summary

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As long as the bottom is at least temporarily saturated with water and is saline to some degree, sea arrowgrass has no problem growing. That can mean high up as well as lower down in salt marshes and inland of the dike where there is seepage or remnants of salt still in the soil. Compared to its family member marsh arrowgrass, sea arrowgrass forms fuller clusters, is less delicate and its inconspicuous flowers are bunched close together along the stem. In addition, the foot of the stems and leaves grow slanted out of the ground. Sometimes, the plants in the middle of the cluster die so that the remaining plants seem to form a fairy ring, just like some mushrooms.
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Comments

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The Sea Arrow-grass seems to be less common in our area. It prefers brackish or saline wet habitats in the northern mountainous regions of W. Pakistan. A fairly good forage plant and yields sodium carbonates from its ashes which is used in soap making.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
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S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
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eFloras.org
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Comments

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This taxon has been separated into Triglochin concinna and T. maritima based upon the lobing of the ligule and the smaller size of the plants of the former (e.g., J. L. Reveal 1977; R. F. Thorne 1993). On a local basis such a separation seems warranted. Examination of the T. maritima complex throughout the Americas, however, reveals continuous variation from small, widely spaced plants with 2-lobed ligules to large, tufted plants with unlobed ligules, including plants with all combinations of those characters.

Triglochin maritima is important in livestock management because it is quite toxic: it is a cyanide producer.

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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 22 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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Description

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Somewhat sturdy erect perennial of brackish or saline wet habitats with short, stout rhizome; scapes 20-50 (—80) cm. long, stout, often somewhat curved above Leaves linear-subulate, thickish, about half as long as the scapes, 3-4 (—6) mm. wide, not furrowed, semiterete but slightly flattened towards the apex Racemes 20-40 cm. long, scarcely elongating in fruit. Flowers greenish, 2-3 mm. across; pedicel 1-2 mm. long, slightly elongating after flowering, shorter than the fruit, ascending. Perianth segments 2-2.5 mm. long, and nearly as broad, ovate—elliptic with somewhat rounded apex. Carpels (3—) 6, all fertile. Fruit 3-4 mm. long, 2 mm. broad, oblong-ovoid, with angular edges or hexagonal margin, not appressed to the axis; mericarps separating completely on dehiscence, slightly grooved on the back, roundish at the base, each 1-seeded; seed about as long as the carpel.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
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eFloras.org
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Description

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Plants with fibrous strands of old leaves at base, 3.5--61.5 cm. Leaves erect from sheath, mostly shorter than scape, 2.2--11.5 cm; sheath 0.7--2.5 cm  1--1.8 mm, ligule occasionally hoodlike, apically 2-lobed; blade 0.9--1.4 mm wide, apex obtuse to round. Inflorescences: scape often purple near base, mostly exceeding leaves, 1--16.5 cm  0.5--1 mm; racemes 6--45 cm  1.5--7 mm; pedicel 1--4  0.2--0.3 mm. Flowers: tepals elliptic, 1.3--1.7  0.6--1.4 mm, apex acute; pistils 6, all fertile. Fruits: fruiting receptacle without wings; schizocarps linear to near globose, 2--4.5  1.5--2 mm; mericarps linear to linear-obovate, weakly ridged, 1.5--3.5  0.7--1 mm, beak erect to recurved, 0.2 mm. 2n = 12, 24, 36, 48, 120.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 22 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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Distribution

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N. temperate regions, Himalaya & Tibet.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
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K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
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Distribution

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Distribution: Europe, Asia, N. Africa and N. America.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
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S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
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eFloras.org
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Distribution

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Alta., B.C., Man., N.B., Nfld. and Labr., N.W.T., N.S., Nunavut, Ont., P.E.I., Que., Sask., Yukon; Alaska, Ariz., Calif., Colo., Conn., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kans., Maine, Mass., Mich., Minn., Mont., Nebr., Nev., N.H., N.J., N.Mex., N.Y., N.Dak., Ohio, Okla., Oreg., Pa., R.I., S.Dak., Utah, Vt., Wash., Wis., Wyo.; Mexico; South America; n Europe; n Asia.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 22 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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Elevation Range

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2600-4600 m
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
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K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
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eFloras.org
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Flower/Fruit

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Fl. Per. May-September.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
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S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
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eFloras.org
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Flowering/Fruiting

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Flowering summer--fall.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 22 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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Habitat

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Coastal and mountain marsh areas and moist alkaline meadows; 0--4000m.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 22 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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Synonym

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Triglochin concinna J. B. Davy; T. concinna var. debilis (M. E. Jones) J. T. Howell; T. debilis (M. E. Jones) Á. Löve & D. Löve; T. elata Nuttall
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 22 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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Triglochin maritima

provided by wikipedia EN

Triglochin maritima is a species of flowering plant in the arrowgrass family Juncaginaceae. It is found in brackish marshes, freshwater marshes, wet sandy beaches, fens, damp grassland and bogs. It has a circumboreal distribution, occurring throughout the northern Northern Hemisphere. In the British Isles it is common on the coast, but very rare inland.

Description

It is similar to marsh arrowgrass (Triglochin palustris) but has the following differences: it has stolons, is stouter. The leaves are fleshy and not furrowed above. It is not very aromatic. The raceme are more dense and like sea plantain. The flowers are fleshier[1]. The fruits are oval, 4 mm long, 2 mm wide.[2]

It varies in height from 8-30 inches (to 45 cm). It flowers in May to August; flowers are greenish, 3 petalled, edged with purple, 1/8 inch (2mm) across, in a long spike.[3][4] Common names include seaside arrowgrass,[5] common arrowgrass, sea arrowgrass and shore arrowgrass.

It can be an annual or perennial.[6]

Triglochin concinna is a synonym of this species.[7]

This plant is toxic, as it can produce cyanide. This species has been known to cause losses in cattle, with green leaves being more toxic than dried material[1].

References

 src= Wikimedia Commons has media related to Triglochin maritima.
  1. ^ a b C. Dwight Marsh, A. B. Clawson, and G. C. Roe Jr (1929). Arrow grass as a Stock-Poisoning Plant. United States Department of Agriculture.
  2. ^ Rose, Francis (2006). The Wild Flower Key. Frederick Warne & Co. p. 488. ISBN 978-0-7232-5175-0..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output q{quotes:"""""'"'"}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-free a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  3. ^ Common Arrow-grass (Triglochin maritima)
  4. ^ Sterry, Paul (2006). Complete British Wild Flowers. HarperCollins Publishers Ltd. p. 188. ISBN 978-0-00-781484-8.
  5. ^ "Triglochin maritima". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 15 December 2015.
  6. ^ Phillips, Roger (1994). Wild Flowers of Britain. Macmillan Reference Books. p. 52. ISBN 0-330-25183-X.
  7. ^ "Triglochin maritima in Flora of North America". www.efloras.org. Retrieved 2018-09-22.


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Triglochin maritima: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Triglochin maritima is a species of flowering plant in the arrowgrass family Juncaginaceae. It is found in brackish marshes, freshwater marshes, wet sandy beaches, fens, damp grassland and bogs. It has a circumboreal distribution, occurring throughout the northern Northern Hemisphere. In the British Isles it is common on the coast, but very rare inland.

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