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Comments

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Outside of Europe most Zannichellia are considered to be Z. palustris (W. Van Vierssen 1982). In Europe three species have been recognized based on stamen length, fruit length, podogyne length, and the rostrum to fruit length ratio. For Z. palustris in Europe the mean rostrum length is 0.78 ± 0.20deletion} mm, the mean podogyne length is 0.4 ± 0.19 mm, and the rostrum to fruit ratio is less than 0.5 (W. Van Wierssen Vierssen 1982). North American Zannichellia does not match any of these figures exactly. In North America Zannichellia has been considered historically to comprise only one species, which has been called Z. palustris. Until further research determines the range of Zannichellia and species delimitations, we areI am continuing to consider all North American material to be monospecific and am are applying the name Z. palustris to our that material.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
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Flora of North America Vol. 22 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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Description

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Leaves linear, opposite or in whorls. Peduncle of the inflorescence 1-1.5 mm long. Male and female flowers subsessile; pedicels 0.5-1 mm. style very short in flower, 2-2.5 mm in fruit; stigma peltate, wavy; achenes 2-5, stalked; stalk 1-1.5 mm long, back of the achene curved and dentate.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
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S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
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eFloras.org
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Description

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Herbs entirely submersed. Stems to 50 cm ´ 0.2----0.6 mm. Leaves 3.5--4.2 cm ´ 0.2--1 mm, apex acute. Staminate flowers: filament 1.5--2 mm, connective prolonged into blunt tip 0.1 mm. Pistillate flowers: pistils 4--5; style 0.4--0.7 mm. Fruits 1.7--2.8 ´ 0.6--0.9 mm; rostrum 0.7--2 mm; podogyne 0.1--1.5 mm; pedicel 0.3--1.2 mm.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 22 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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Distribution

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Distribution: A cosmopolitan species.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
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S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
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eFloras.org
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Distribution

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Alta., B.C., Man., N.B., Nfld. and Labr. (Nfld.), N.W.T., N.S., Ont., P.E.I., Que., Sask.; Ala., Alaska, Ariz., Ark., Calif., Colo., Conn., Del., D.C., Fla., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kans., Ky., La., Maine, Md., Mass., Mich., Minn., Miss., Mo., Mont., Nebr., Nev., N.H., N.J., N.Mex., N.Y., N.C., N.Dak., Ohio, Okla., Oreg., Pa., R.I., S.Dak., Tenn., Tex., Utah, Vt., Va., Wash., W.Va., Wis., Wyo.; Mexico; West Indies; Central America; South America; Eurasia; Africa; Australia.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 22 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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Flower/Fruit

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Fl. Per. February-March.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
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S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
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eFloras.org
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Flowering/Fruiting

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Flowering spring--summer.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 22 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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Habitat

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Brackish or fresh waters of streams, lakes, or estuaries; 0--2900m.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 22 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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Zannichellia palustris

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Zannichellia palustris, the horned pondweed,[1] is a plant found in fresh to brackish waters in the United States (especially in the Chesapeake Bay),[2] Europe, Asia, Australasia, and South America. It is recognizable by its long, thread like leaves, and "stringy" appearance. Its roots are also long and tendril-like, and its seeds bear a distinctive horned shape, hence the common name. The species epithet palustris is Latin for "of the marsh" and indicates its common habitat.[3] Chromosome number was confirmed as 2n = 24 in Japan.[4]

References

  1. ^ Hadlington, Simon (2003-02-24). "Science & nature: Invasion of the Lakes ; Eighty years ago, a naturalist surveyed the Lake District's aquatic plant life. Ecologists recently repeated his work. The changes they found, says SIMON HADLINGTON, provide a stark warning". The Independent. p. 12.
  2. ^ "Horned Pondweed". Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Retrieved 2009-04-18.
  3. ^ Archibald William Smith A Gardener's Handbook of Plant Names: Their Meanings and Origins, p. 258, at Google Books
  4. ^ Norio Tanaka, Yu Ito, Ruriko Matsuyama and Koichi Uehara (2007) Chromosome numbers of Zannichellia L. (Zannichelliaceae) in Japan. Bulletin of the National Museum of Nature and Science. Series B 33: 133-136
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Zannichellia palustris: Brief Summary

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Zannichellia palustris, the horned pondweed, is a plant found in fresh to brackish waters in the United States (especially in the Chesapeake Bay), Europe, Asia, Australasia, and South America. It is recognizable by its long, thread like leaves, and "stringy" appearance. Its roots are also long and tendril-like, and its seeds bear a distinctive horned shape, hence the common name. The species epithet palustris is Latin for "of the marsh" and indicates its common habitat. Chromosome number was confirmed as 2n = 24 in Japan.

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