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Bristle Club Rush

Isolepis setacea (L.) R. Br.

Comments

provided by eFloras
Isolepis setacea belongs to a distinct group of species characterized by ridged achenes (A. M. Muasya et al. 2001). Isolepis setacea was collected in 1874 on waste at Camden, New Jersey, and in the 1880s at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; it has not persisted in the East. It has been known from the Pacific Coast since at least 1921. It is reported as native to Eurasia and Africa. It is cultivated as an ornamental.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 23: 138, 139, 140 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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Comments

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The species is readily distinguished as small annual with small pseudolateral inflorescence and the lowest bract only slightly longer than the inflorescence; it also has leaf blades resembling the stem, but attached to sheaths surrounding stem base.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 206: 40 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
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S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
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eFloras.org
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Description

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Plants perennial (annual?), forming dense mats; rhizomes creeping; culms, leaves, and bracts orange-punctate at 10–15X. Culms 3–25 cm × 0.2–0.3 mm. Leaves: sheaths usually reddish proximally; distal blade rudimentary to 6 cm × 0.2–0.5 mm. Inflorescences: involucral bracts 1 or 2; proximal bract erect to spreading, 3–10(–20) mm; distal bract reflexed, to 5 mm. Spikelets 3–6 × 2 mm; scales partly orange- to red- or blackish brown, midrib greenish to stramineous, not gibbous, prominently ribbed near midrib, often with 1+ pale veins on dark sides, 1.2–1.6 × 0.6–1 mm, membranous, hyaline, apex rounded to obtuse, mucro to 0.1 mm; proximal scale like others. Flowers: anthers 0.3–0.5 mm; styles 3-fid or 3-fid and 2-fid. Achenes falling separately from floral scales, orange-brown, each face prominently longitudinally 5–8-ribbed, many fine transverse ridges evident at 20–30X, broadly obovoid to oblong, thickly biconvex to compressed-trigonous, abaxial angle obscure, lateral angles prominent, faces convex, 0.8–1 × 0.5 mm. 2n = 28.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 23: 138, 139, 140 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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eFloras

Description

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Annual, forming small tussocks, 2.5-20 cm. Roots fibrous. Stem 0.2-0.3 mm diam., terete, smooth, green or yellowish green. Leaves reduced, usually with one complete leaf at stem base; sheaths to 20 mm, lowest bladeless, scarious, often reddish; longest much overtopping lower ones, yellow green or lower part often reddish, mouth wide, scarious, oblique; blades 1-20 mm, as wide as stem, channelled, smooth, apex obtuse. Inflorescence 1-2 sessile spikes; bract as long as spike or to 10 mm, basal part (sheath) scarious, keeled, often reddish brown. Spikes 2-5 mm, globose or ovoid, with up to c. 30 glumes; when two spikes, lower with obtuse, glume-like prophyll; glumes 1.3-1.5 mm, cymbiform, keeled, midnerve strong, at first green, smooth, barely reaching obtuse apex, sides with 3-5 fine nerves, reddish brown or sometimes colourless, scarious. Stamens 2; stigmas 3. Nut 0.7-0.9 x 0.5-0.6 mm, with wide stipe and narrow beak c. 0.1 mm, obovoid, unequally bi-convex, brown, sometimes whitish, trabeculate with pronounced longitudinal ribs.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 206: 40 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
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eFloras

Distribution

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Eurasia, Australia.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
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K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
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Distribution

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introduced; B.C.; Calif., Oreg., Wash.; Eurasia; Africa; Australia (including Tasmania); New Zealand.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 23: 138, 139, 140 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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Distribution

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Distribution: Europe, N Africa, mountains of E Africa, southern Africa, Lebanon, Syria, Turkey, Caucasus, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tadjikistan, W China, in SW Asia from NW Iran to Pakistan and east to Sikkim; introduced to western N America and Tasmania.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 206: 40 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
original
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eFloras

Elevation Range

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2200-3800 m
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
author
K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
project
eFloras.org
original
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partner site
eFloras

Flower/Fruit

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Fl. & Fr.: June - July.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 206: 40 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Flowering/Fruiting

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Fruiting late spring–fall.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 23: 138, 139, 140 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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eFloras

Habitat

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Stream banks, pond margins, ditches, coastal, rarely inland; 0–1500m.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 23: 138, 139, 140 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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eFloras

Habitat

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By water courses, in boggy places with moving water; 700-3200 m.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 206: 40 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
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eFloras

Synonym

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Scirpus setaceus Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 1: 49. 1753
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 23: 138, 139, 140 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
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Synonym

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Scirpus setaceus L., Sp. Pl. 1: 49. 1753; C.B.Clarke, l.c. 654; R.R.Stewart l.c. 103; Schoenoplectus setaceus (L.) Palla, in E. Hallier & A. Brand (eds.), W.D.J. Koch, Syn. Fl. Germ., ed. 3, 3: 2538. 1905; Madalski, Fl. Polon. Terr. Adiac. Icon. 3(1): 258. 1979; Uniyal & al., Cyperaceae Uttar Pradesh: 38 1997.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 206: 40 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Isolepis setacea

provided by wikipedia EN

Isolepis setacea (syn. Scirpus setaceus) is a species of flowering plant in the sedge family known by the common names bristle club-rush[1] and bristleleaf bulrush.[2] It is native to Eurasia and Africa, and possibly Australasia. It can be found in other places, including some areas in North America, where it is an introduced species. It grows in many types of moist and wet habitat, often in coastal regions, and sometimes inland. It is a perennial herb which forms mats of very thin, grooved, erect or arching stems up to about 20 centimeters tall. The leaves sheath the stem bases and have short, flat, thick blades. The inflorescence is a solitary spikelet just a few millimeters long, or a cluster of up to three spikelets. These are accompanied by a stiff bract extending past the flowers.

References

  1. ^ BSBI List 2007 (xls). Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland. Archived from the original (xls) on 2015-06-26. Retrieved 2014-10-17.
  2. ^ "Isolepis setacea". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 22 January 2016.

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Isolepis setacea: Brief Summary

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Isolepis setacea (syn. Scirpus setaceus) is a species of flowering plant in the sedge family known by the common names bristle club-rush and bristleleaf bulrush. It is native to Eurasia and Africa, and possibly Australasia. It can be found in other places, including some areas in North America, where it is an introduced species. It grows in many types of moist and wet habitat, often in coastal regions, and sometimes inland. It is a perennial herb which forms mats of very thin, grooved, erect or arching stems up to about 20 centimeters tall. The leaves sheath the stem bases and have short, flat, thick blades. The inflorescence is a solitary spikelet just a few millimeters long, or a cluster of up to three spikelets. These are accompanied by a stiff bract extending past the flowers.

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