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Monk Orchid

Oeceoclades maculata (Lindl.) Lindl.

Comments

provided by eFloras
Oeceoclades maculata was first discovered in the United States in Miami-Dade County, Florida in 1974, and is spreading rapidly in central and southern Florida. It is not known whether it escaped from cultivation or arrived in Florida via windblown seeds from the Greater Antilles or the nearby Bahama Archipelago.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
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Flora of North America Vol. 26: 640, 641 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Description

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Plants 20–43 cm. Roots fibrous, white, stout. Pseudobulbs dark green, ovoid to orbicular, 2–5 × 1–3 cm, often concealed by imbricate fibrous sheaths or 1 closely appressed sheath, 1-leaved at apex. Leaves: blade nearly erect, olive green with dark green mottling, oblong-elliptic, abaxially keeled, 12–32 × 3.5–5.5 cm, succulent leathery, apex acute. Inflorescences lax, 10–42 cm; peduncles erect, slender, with few remote sheaths. Flowers 5–15, 9–15 mm wide; sepals and petals light brown to pinkish green; sepals 8–12 × 2–3 mm; dorsal sepal linear-oblong, apex acute; lateral sepals slightly falcate; petals oblong-elliptic, 12 × 4 mm, apex acute; lip white with 2 parallel pink blotches, 9–14 × 8–12 mm, lateral lobes erect, white with thin, radiating purple lines, orbiculate, spur curved, 5 × 2 mm; column curved, white, 5–7 mm. Capsules pendent, elliptic-oblong, to 3.5 cm.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 640, 641 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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Distribution

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Fla.; Mexico; West Indies; Central America; South America; Africa.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 640, 641 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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Flowering/Fruiting

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Flowering Aug--Nov.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 640, 641 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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eFloras

Habitat

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In humus under shady forests, in orchards and residential areas; 0--10m.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 640, 641 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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Synonym

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Angraecum maculatum Lindley, Coll. Bot., plate 15 and text on facing page. 1821; Eulophia maculata (Lindley) Reichenbach f.; Eulophidium maculatum (Lindley) Pfitzer
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 26: 640, 641 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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Derivation of specific name

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
maculata: spotted, blotched
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Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Oeceoclades maculata (Lindl.) Lindl. Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/species.php?species_id=119810
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Mark Hyde
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Bart Wursten
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Petra Ballings
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Oeceoclades maculata

provided by wikipedia EN

Oeceoclades maculata, sometimes known as the monk orchid or African spotted orchid, is a terrestrial orchid species in the genus Oeceoclades that is native to tropical Africa and now naturalized in South and Central America, the Caribbean, and Florida in North America.[1] It was first described by the English botanist John Lindley as Angraecum maculatum in 1821 based on a specimen collected from South America. Lindley later revised his original placement and moved the species to the genus Oeceoclades in 1833.[1]

"
Group of Oeceoclades maculata with infructescences

Oeceoclades maculata was first found naturalized outside of Africa in Brazil in 1829. It was later found throughout the neotropics and specifically in Puerto Rico in the mid-1960s and in Florida in the early 1970s. It is considered to be one of the most successful invasive orchids.[2]

When Leslie Andrew Garay and Peter Taylor resurrected and revised the genus Oeceoclades in 1976, they recognized O. maculata and two related species, O. mackenii and O. monophylla. All three were described as being very similar in appearance and according to Garay and Taylor, the species could be distinguished by the proportions of the labellum, allowing for easy identification in preserved specimens or in the field in their opinion. Oeceoclades mackenii was said to have a labellum that was shorter than wide and possessed a branched inflorescence, while the labellum of O. monophylla had a "distinct elongate isthmus." Garay and Taylor also recognized the subspecies O. maculata subsp. pterocarpa, which was said to have winged capsules.[3] Later authors did not agree with recognizing these distinctions as sufficient to maintain separate taxa and thus reduced these names to synonyms of O. maculata.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d WCSP 2015. World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Published on the internet. Accessed: 2015-6-9
  2. ^ Stern, W.L. 1988. The long-distance dispersal of Oeceoclades maculata. American Orchid Society Bulletin, 57(9): 960-971.
  3. ^ Garay, L.A., and P. Taylor. 1976. The genus Oeceoclades Lindl. Botanical Museum Leaflets, Harvard University 24(9): 249-274.

"
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Oeceoclades maculata: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Oeceoclades maculata, sometimes known as the monk orchid or African spotted orchid, is a terrestrial orchid species in the genus Oeceoclades that is native to tropical Africa and now naturalized in South and Central America, the Caribbean, and Florida in North America. It was first described by the English botanist John Lindley as Angraecum maculatum in 1821 based on a specimen collected from South America. Lindley later revised his original placement and moved the species to the genus Oeceoclades in 1833.

" Group of Oeceoclades maculata with infructescences

Oeceoclades maculata was first found naturalized outside of Africa in Brazil in 1829. It was later found throughout the neotropics and specifically in Puerto Rico in the mid-1960s and in Florida in the early 1970s. It is considered to be one of the most successful invasive orchids.

When Leslie Andrew Garay and Peter Taylor resurrected and revised the genus Oeceoclades in 1976, they recognized O. maculata and two related species, O. mackenii and O. monophylla. All three were described as being very similar in appearance and according to Garay and Taylor, the species could be distinguished by the proportions of the labellum, allowing for easy identification in preserved specimens or in the field in their opinion. Oeceoclades mackenii was said to have a labellum that was shorter than wide and possessed a branched inflorescence, while the labellum of O. monophylla had a "distinct elongate isthmus." Garay and Taylor also recognized the subspecies O. maculata subsp. pterocarpa, which was said to have winged capsules. Later authors did not agree with recognizing these distinctions as sufficient to maintain separate taxa and thus reduced these names to synonyms of O. maculata.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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