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Comments

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This species is cultivated as an ornamental.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 11: 251, 254 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of China @ eFloras.org
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Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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Description

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Shrubs, 1-3 m tall. Branchlets grayish tomentulose when young. Stipules triangular, 6-10 mm, pilose; petiole 4-8 cm; leaf blade broadly ovate or ovate, 8-20 × 5-14 cm, papyraceous, base broadly cuneate, obtuse, or subcordate, margin coarsely serrate, apex acuminate or acute; basal veins 3-5. Plants dioecious. Only female flowers known. Female flowers 3-7 in each bract, fascicled, subsessile; spikes 15-30 cm, axillary, pendulous; peduncle short, pubescent; bracts scattered, ovate-rhombic, ca. 1 mm, entire; sepals (3 or)4, subovate, ca. 1 mm, acute, puberulent; ovary subglobose, densely hirtellous; styles 3, 5-7 mm, laciniate, crimson or red-purple. Fl. Feb-Nov.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 11: 251, 254 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Distribution

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Fujian, Guangdong, S Guangxi, Hainan, Taiwan, S Yunnan [widely cultivated; origin possibly Bismarck Archipelago].
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 11: 251, 254 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Habitat

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Cultivated in gardens; below 100-200 m.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 11: 251, 254 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
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eFloras

Brief Summary

provided by EOL authors
Chenille plant is an erect, sparsely branched shrub that can get 6-12 ft (1.8-3.7 m) high with a spread of 3-6 ft (0.9-1.8 m). Potted plants are kept considerably smaller. The evergreen leaves are oval, 4-9 in (10-23 cm) long, 3-4 in (7.6-10 cm) wide, and pointed on the tips. Chenille plant is dioecious, meaning that the staminate (male) and pistillate (female) flowers are on separate plants. The pistillate flowers are purple, bright red or crimson, and clustered in velvety catkins, 8-20 in (20-51 cm) long and an inch in diameter. They are dense and fluffy, like a cat's tail, and they appear intermittently throughout the whole year as long as conditions are favorable.
Chenille plant is native to New Guinea, the Malay Archipelago and other islands in the East Indies.
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Culture

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Light: Full sun to partial shade. Best flowering is on plants in full sun. Moisture: Chenille plant needs a humid environment and frequent watering during the summer growing season. Hardiness: USDA Zones 10B - 12. Chenille plant does not tolerate frost. Propagation: Propagate chenille plant from cuttings taken in summer. Best results come from semi-ripe wood tip cuttings with a heel.
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Usage

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Chenille plant can be grown in a container on the patio or porch, and brought indoors during cold weather. It looks great in a large hanging basket with its fluffy crimson tassels hanging over the sides. It also can be kept as a houseplant in a bright location, but it will require frequent and heavy pruning, as well as regular misting in an air conditioned room. A common practice is to take cuttings every year and have new young and vigorous plants constantly coming on. In frost free climates, grow this striking ornamental as a free standing specimen shrub or give it a prominent position in a mixed border or hedge. The brightly colored pendulous tassels of chenille plant are extremely showy, and a specimen in full bloom is a spectacular sight.
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Acalypha hispida

provided by wikipedia EN

Acalypha hispida, the chenille plant, is a flowering shrub which belongs to the family Euphorbiaceae,[1] the subfamily Acalyphinae, and the genus Acalypha. Acalypha is the fourth largest genus of the family Euphorbiaceae, and contains many plants native to Hawaii and Oceania.[2]

Names

This plant is also known as the Philippines Medusa, red hot cat's tail and fox tail in English, pokok ekor kucing in Malay, Rabo de Gato in Portuguese, Tai tượng đuôi chồn in Vietnamese, poochavaal in Malayalam and shibjhul in Bengali. Acalypha hispida is cultivated as a house plant because of its attractiveness and brilliantly colored, furry flowers.

The Latin specific epithet hispida means “bristly”, referring to the pendent flowers which vaguely resemble brushes.[3]

Origins

The plant originated in tropical Asia, specifically Malesia and Papuasia,[2] but has become naturalized to multiple countries in North America, including the United States, Mexico, and Belize. In cultivation it is widespread, particularly as a houseplant, and has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[4]

Description

It can grow to be 5–12 feet (1.5–3.7 m)[1] tall, and have a spread of 3–6 feet (0.91–1.83 m), with potted plants being the smallest in growth.[2] The plant has become somewhat domesticated, due to the nature and color of its flowers. It can be grown from seeds as well as from cuttings. It can be kept either as an outdoor plant or as a houseplant. However, care should be taken in growing it, as all parts of the plant are poisonous if ingested by animals.[5]

The plant is dioecious, and therefore there are distinct male and female members of the species. The female plant bears pistillate flowers which are 0.7 millimeters long and range in color from purple to bright red, and grow in clusters along catkins.[2] This feature is the primary reason the plant bears the nickname “red-hot cat tail”. The pistillates will grow all year long as long as the temperatures are favorable.[2] It is an erect shrub of soft stems cultivated by its precious and tiny flowers of a fiery red which in summer hang on pendulous spikes and resemble the tassels of female plants. The leaves are large, oval and bright green to reddish copper.[6]

Chemistry

The clear latex is poisonous and can irritate the skin and mucous membranes (signs of intoxication do not appear until massive amounts of plants have been absorbed). Roots, leaves and flowers are used for medical purposes. The plant itself is very resistant to diseases, but with a certain vulnerability to aphids, which can colonise it and bring it to death.

References

  1. ^ a b "Acalypha hispida Chenille Plant". University of Florida. Retrieved 22 September 2011.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Acalypha hispida". Floridata. Retrieved 22 September 2011.
  3. ^ Harrison, Lorraine (2012). RHS Latin for Gardeners. United Kingdom: Mitchell Beazley. ISBN 184533731X.
  4. ^ "Acalypha hispida". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 23 December 2017.
  5. ^ Idárraga-Piedrahita, A., RDC Ortiz, R. Callejas Posada & M. Merello. (eds.) 2011. Fl. Antioquia: Cat. 2: 9-939. University of Antioquia, Medellín.
  6. ^ Correa A., MD, C. Galdames & M. Stapf. 2004. Cat. Pl. Vasc. Panama 1-599. Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama.

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Acalypha hispida: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Acalypha hispida, the chenille plant, is a flowering shrub which belongs to the family Euphorbiaceae, the subfamily Acalyphinae, and the genus Acalypha. Acalypha is the fourth largest genus of the family Euphorbiaceae, and contains many plants native to Hawaii and Oceania.

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