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Reproduction

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Very little is known about reproduction in Abrocoma cinerea. The length of gestation ranges from 115 to 118 days with 1-2 young per litter. (Grzimeck, 1975; Nowak, 1991)

Range number of offspring: 1 to 3.

Average number of offspring: 2.2.

Average gestation period: 102 days.

Key Reproductive Features: iteroparous ; seasonal breeding ; gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); sexual ; fertilization (Internal ); viviparous

Parental Investment: precocial

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Nash, N. 2001. "Abrocoma cinerea" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_cinerea.html
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Natalee Nash, Fresno City College
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Carl Johansson, Fresno City College
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Behavior

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Perception Channels: tactile ; chemical

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Nash, N. 2001. "Abrocoma cinerea" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_cinerea.html
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Natalee Nash, Fresno City College
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Carl Johansson, Fresno City College
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Conservation Status

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Chinchilla rats are somtimes hunted for pelts. There is no true commercial value but they are sometimes sold to travelers as true Chinchilla. For this reason, and because of habitat destruction, they have become rare. (Nowak, 1991).

US Federal List: no special status

CITES: no special status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: least concern

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Nash, N. 2001. "Abrocoma cinerea" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_cinerea.html
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Natalee Nash, Fresno City College
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Carl Johansson, Fresno City College
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Benefits

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There is no great economic importance to humans. Skins of chinchilla rats are sometimes sold at fur markets but are not of much value (Nowak, 1991).

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Nash, N. 2001. "Abrocoma cinerea" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_cinerea.html
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Natalee Nash, Fresno City College
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Carl Johansson, Fresno City College
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Trophic Strategy

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Chinchilla rats are herbivorous and nocturnal. The diet includes seeds, fruits, and nuts. Though primarily terrestrial, they are capable of climbing as well. (Encarta, 2000; Encyclopedia Britannica Online, 2000)

Primary Diet: herbivore (Granivore )

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Nash, N. 2001. "Abrocoma cinerea" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_cinerea.html
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Natalee Nash, Fresno City College
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Distribution

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Chinchilla rats, Ambrocoma cinerea are restricted to the Altiplano of the Andes of South America, from Southern Bolivia and Peru into Central Chile. (Myers, 1999)

Biogeographic Regions: neotropical (Native )

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Nash, N. 2001. "Abrocoma cinerea" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_cinerea.html
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Natalee Nash, Fresno City College
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Carl Johansson, Fresno City College
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Habitat

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Chinchilla rats are restricted to the Altiplano region of the Andes, they occur in rocky areas between 3700 and 5000 meters. Burrows can commonly be found under rocks or at the bases of shrubs. (Encarta, 2000; Nowak, 1991).

Terrestrial Biomes: mountains

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Nash, N. 2001. "Abrocoma cinerea" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_cinerea.html
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Natalee Nash, Fresno City College
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Carl Johansson, Fresno City College
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Morphology

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Chinchilla rats range from 15 to 25 cm long, not including the tail, which can be from 6 to 18 cm long. They weigh 200 to 300 g. Chinchilla rats have large, round ears and large eyes, the head is elongate. Limbs are short with 4 digits on the forefoot and 5 on the hindfoot. The fur is thick and soft,silver-gray in color above and white or yellow underneath. The fur is similar in texture to a chinchilla's, though less desirable in the fur trade. (Encarta, 2000; Nowak, 1991)

Range mass: 0.200 to 0.300 kg.

Other Physical Features: endothermic ; bilateral symmetry

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Nash, N. 2001. "Abrocoma cinerea" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_cinerea.html
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Natalee Nash, Fresno City College
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Ashy chinchilla rat

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The ashy chinchilla rat (Abrocoma cinerea) is a species of chinchilla rats in the family Abrocomidae found in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, and Peru.

Description

Their total length is 21–43 cm, with the body being 15–25 cm and the tail being 6–8 cm. They have soft, thick, silver fur on the top of their bodies, and white or yellow fur on their abdomens. They have four toes on their front feet, and five toes on their back feet.[2]

Distribution and habitat

The ashy chinchilla rat is endemic to land at high elevations in southeastern Peru, southwestern Bolivia, northern Chile and northwestern Argentina. Its altitudinal range is from about 3,850 to 5,000 metres (12,600 to 16,400 ft) above sea level. It lives in rocky areas, digging its burrows at the base of bushes, under rocks, among shale or at the base of stone walls.[1]

Behavior and diet

Ashy chinchilla rats live underground, with a group of up to six individuals occupying one burrow. Several colonial burrows may be grouped close together. Little is known of their breeding habits but the gestation period is about 118 days and one or two young are born at a time.[2]

They are herbivores, so they eat seeds, fruit, and nuts, especially Thola spp. and Yareta. They are sociable animals and make squeaking and grunting noises when they are scared or fighting, and gurgling sounds when grooming each other.[2]

Status

Ashy chinchilla rats are sometimes hunted for their pelts, which are sold in local markets, sometimes to tourists.[2] They have a large range and are plentiful within that area. The population is presumed to be large and the population trend is steady. The animals are able to adapt to some degree of habitat modification and the International Union for Conservation of Nature has rated their conservation status as being of "least concern".[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c Dunnum, J.; Bernal, N.; Vivar, E.; Jayat, J. & Ojeda, R. (2008). "Abrocoma cinerea". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2008. Retrieved 4 August 2015.old-form url
  2. ^ a b c d "Ashy Chinchilla Rat (abrocoma Cinerea): Species Account". Retrieved 2015-08-04.
  • Woods, C. A. and C. W. Kilpatrick. 2005. Hystricognathi. pp 1538–1600 in Mammal Species of the World: a Taxonomic and Geographic Reference 3rd ed. D. E. Wilson and D. M. Reeder eds. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington D.C.
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Ashy chinchilla rat: Brief Summary

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The ashy chinchilla rat (Abrocoma cinerea) is a species of chinchilla rats in the family Abrocomidae found in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, and Peru.

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