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North American Ecology (US and Canada)

provided by North American Butterfly Knowledge Network
A temporary resident in South Texas and stray beyond (Scott 1986). Habitats are OPEN WOODLANDS. Host plants are usually trees with most known hosts from CAPPARIDACEAE. Eggs are laid on the host plant singly. Individuals do not overwinter in North America (Scott 1986). Treated as Ascia josephina by Scott 1986.
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Leslie Ries
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Leslie Ries

Ganyra josephina

provided by wikipedia EN

Ganyra josephina, the giant white, is a butterfly in the family Pieridae. It is found from southern Texas through Mexico and Central America to northern South America. The habitat consists of open, dry, subtropical forests.[2]

The wingspan is 73–96 mm (2.9–3.8 in). The cell of the upper forewing of the male contains a prominent round black spot. The wet-season form of the female has a black cell spot and also some diffuse black postmedian spots. The veins are outlined with black near the wing margins. The dry-season form of the female is not so prominently marked. Adults are on wing from September to December in southern Texas. They feed on flower nectar from a variety of weeds and garden plants including Lantana, Eupatorium and Bougainvillea.[2]

The larvae feed on older leaves of Capparidaceae species.[2]

Subspecies

The following subspecies are recognized:[1]

  • G. j. josephina
  • G. j. josepha (Salvin & Godman, 1868) (southern Texas, Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua)
  • G. j. krugii (Dewitz, 1877) (Puerto Rico)
  • G. j. menciae (Ramsden, [1914]) (Cuba)
  • G. j. janeta (Dixey, 1915) (Venezuela)
  • G. j. paramaryllis (Comstock, 1943) (Jamaica)

References

  1. ^ a b Ganyra, Site of Markku Savela
  2. ^ a b c Butterflies and Moths of North America
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Ganyra josephina: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Ganyra josephina, the giant white, is a butterfly in the family Pieridae. It is found from southern Texas through Mexico and Central America to northern South America. The habitat consists of open, dry, subtropical forests.

The wingspan is 73–96 mm (2.9–3.8 in). The cell of the upper forewing of the male contains a prominent round black spot. The wet-season form of the female has a black cell spot and also some diffuse black postmedian spots. The veins are outlined with black near the wing margins. The dry-season form of the female is not so prominently marked. Adults are on wing from September to December in southern Texas. They feed on flower nectar from a variety of weeds and garden plants including Lantana, Eupatorium and Bougainvillea.

The larvae feed on older leaves of Capparidaceae species.

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