dcsimg

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

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Maximum longevity: 8 years Observations: Longevity has only been evaluated in a small number of animals and so may be underestimated (http://www.dec.state.ny.us/).
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Joao Pedro de Magalhaes
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de Magalhaes, J. P.
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Threats

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Least Concern (LC)
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Recorder
Rainer Froese
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Biology

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Usually occurs over mud and detritus in vegetated sloughs, lakes, and pools and backwaters of creeks and small to medium rivers.
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Mud sunfish

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The mud sunfish (Acantharchus pomotis) is a sunfish (family Centrarchidae) widely distributed in the fresh waters along the Atlantic coast of North America, ranging from New York to Florida.

The mud sunfish prefers sluggish, weedy waters of 10–22 °C (50–72 °F), over muddy, detritus-strewn bottoms, and occurs in small lakes as well as riverine backwaters. The maximum recorded size of this species is 21 cm (8.3 in).

A. pomotis is currently the only species of genus Acantharchus but Baird had originally assigned it to Centrarchus. The generic name, Acantharchus, derives from the Greek άκανθα (thorn) and άρχος (ruler). A. pomotis is sometimes also known as the mud bass.

References

  1. ^ NatureServe (2015). "Acantharchus pomotis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2015. Retrieved February 25, 2016.old-form url
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Mud sunfish: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The mud sunfish (Acantharchus pomotis) is a sunfish (family Centrarchidae) widely distributed in the fresh waters along the Atlantic coast of North America, ranging from New York to Florida.

The mud sunfish prefers sluggish, weedy waters of 10–22 °C (50–72 °F), over muddy, detritus-strewn bottoms, and occurs in small lakes as well as riverine backwaters. The maximum recorded size of this species is 21 cm (8.3 in).

A. pomotis is currently the only species of genus Acantharchus but Baird had originally assigned it to Centrarchus. The generic name, Acantharchus, derives from the Greek άκανθα (thorn) and άρχος (ruler). A. pomotis is sometimes also known as the mud bass.

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