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Distribution

provided by Catalog of Hymenoptera in America North of Mexico
Mont., Nebr., and N. Mex., west to B.C., Wash., Oreg., and Calif. (B.C., Ariz., Calif., Colo., Idaho, Mont., Nebraska, Nev., N. Mex., Oreg., Utah, Wash., and Wyo.).
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bibliographic citation
Catalog of Hymenoptera in America North of Mexico. 1979. Prepared cooperatively by specialists on the various groups of Hymenoptera under the direction of Karl V. Krombein and Paul D. Hurd, Jr., Smithsonian Institution, and David R. Smith and B. D. Burks, Systematic Entomology Laboratory, Insect Identification and Beneficial Insect Introduction Institute. Science and Education Administration, United States Department of Agriculture.

Biology

provided by Halictidae LifeDesk

This bee's nest architecture is described by Sakagami and Michener (1962) as Neocorynura farinosus: Nest architecture is Type IIIa: Lateral burrows branch off at approximately right angles from the main burrow with a cell at the end of each. Flat ground is the only or typical substrate used for nesting.

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Smith, Adam
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Comprehensive Description

provided by Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
Halictus (Halictus) farinosus Smith

Halictus farinosus is one of the most abundant species of the genus in western North America, ranging from Nebraska, Montana, and British Columbia south to New Mexico and California. It is a highly polylectic species, gathering pollen from a wide range of plants in a broad spectrum of environments. Females are active in the spring, summer, and fall. They take pollen from Larrea primarily on the desert periphery.
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bibliographic citation
Hurd, Paul D., Jr. and Linsley, E. Gorton. 1975. "The principal Larrea bees of the southwestern United States (Hymenoptera, Apoidea)." Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology. 1-74. https://doi.org/10.5479/si.00810282.193

Halictus farinosus

provided by wikipedia EN

Halictus farinosus is a species of sweat bee in the family Halictidae.[1][2][3]

The Halictus farinosus is a ground-nesting sweat bee.[4][5] The species is a primitively eusocial bee, of intermediate social strength when compared to other social species in the genus Halictus.[4][6]

References

  1. ^ "Halictus farinosus Report". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 2019-09-22.
  2. ^ "Halictus farinosus". GBIF. Retrieved 2019-09-22.
  3. ^ "Halictus farinosus species Information". BugGuide.net. Retrieved 2019-09-22.
  4. ^ a b Albert, Jennifer; Packer, Laurence (2013-04-24). "Nesting biology and phenology of a population of Halictus farinosus Smith (Hymenoptera, Halictidae) in northern Utah". Journal of Hymenoptera Research. 32: 55–73. doi:10.3897/jhr.32.4646. ISSN 1314-2607.
  5. ^ Rivers, James W.; Mathis, Codey L.; Moldenke, Andrew R.; Betts, Matthew G. (2018). "Wild bee diversity is enhanced by experimental removal of timber harvest residue within intensively managed conifer forest". GCB Bioenergy. 10 (10): 766–781. doi:10.1111/gcbb.12531. ISSN 1757-1707.
  6. ^ Bromham, Lindell; Leys, Remko (2005-06-01). "Sociality and the Rate of Molecular Evolution". Molecular Biology and Evolution. 22 (6): 1393–1402. doi:10.1093/molbev/msi133. ISSN 0737-4038. PMID 15758201.
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Halictus farinosus: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Halictus farinosus is a species of sweat bee in the family Halictidae.

The Halictus farinosus is a ground-nesting sweat bee. The species is a primitively eusocial bee, of intermediate social strength when compared to other social species in the genus Halictus.

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cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN