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Description

provided by eFloras
A large polygamous deciduous lofty tree. Bark smooth, ash coloured. Leaves 30-90 cm long, abruptly pinnate, leaflets irregularly glandular-toothed, 8-14 pairs, alternate or subopposite, variable in shape, unequal at base, glabrous, petiolules 2-3 cm long. Inflorescence a large lax panicle; bract minute, covered with soft hairs. Flowers small, many, slightly tinged with yellow. Bisexual flower: calyx 5 lobed. Corolla: petals 5 glabrous, ovate-lanceolate, much larger than the calyx lobes. Stamens 10, inserted below the disc, filaments glabrous; shorter than the petals. Stigma short. Male flower similar to bisexual flower but without rudimentary ovary. Fruit samara, 3-4.5 cm long and c. 1 cm broad, lanceolate, twisted at the top, red coloured, acute, seed one in the centre of samara.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 4 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
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Distribution

provided by eFloras
Distribution: Australia, China, India, it is sometimes cultivated in Pakistan.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 4 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Flower/Fruit

provided by eFloras
Fl. Per.: February-March.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of Pakistan Vol. 0: 4 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of Pakistan @ eFloras.org
editor
S. I. Ali & M. Qaiser
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Ailanthus excelsa

provided by wikipedia EN

Ailanthus excelsa, commonly known as tree of heaven, is a large deciduous tree found in India and Sri Lanka.[1] In Tamil, it is also known as Pi-Nari Maram due to its disagreeable odor. The trees are grown along the edges of fields and rivers to mark boundaries and prevent soil erosion.[2]

The tree has several uses in medicine as the gum and the bitter, aromatic leaves are reported to have medicinal properties. The bark is a febrifuge and can be used as a treatment against asthma, bronchitis and dysentery.[3] The leaves and bark are also in good repute as a tonic that is used after labor. The juice of the leaves and fresh bark is used as a remedy for after-pains.[4]

The tree is also used in matchstick industry[5], as fodder for goats[6], and is one of the best tree used to trap Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM).

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References

  1. ^ Krishen, Pradip (2013). Jungle Trees of Central India. Penguin group. p. 164. ISBN 9780143420743.
  2. ^ "Ailanthus excelsa - Useful Tropical Plants". tropical.theferns.info. Retrieved 2019-12-17.
  3. ^ Gamble, J. S. (1972). A Manual of Indian Timbers. Bishen Singh Mahendra Pal Singh.
  4. ^ "Ailanthus excelsa - Useful Tropical Plants". tropical.theferns.info. Retrieved 2019-12-17.
  5. ^ "Ailanthus excelsa - Useful Tropical Plants". tropical.theferns.info. Retrieved 2019-12-17.
  6. ^ Azim, A.; Khan, A. G.; Ahmad, J.; Ayaz, M.; Mirza, I. H. (January 2002). "Nutritional Evaluation of Fodder Tree Leaves with Goats". Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences. 15: 34–37. doi:10.5713/ajas.2002.34 – via Research Gate.
"
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Wikipedia authors and editors
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Ailanthus excelsa: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Ailanthus excelsa, commonly known as tree of heaven, is a large deciduous tree found in India and Sri Lanka. In Tamil, it is also known as Pi-Nari Maram due to its disagreeable odor. The trees are grown along the edges of fields and rivers to mark boundaries and prevent soil erosion.

The tree has several uses in medicine as the gum and the bitter, aromatic leaves are reported to have medicinal properties. The bark is a febrifuge and can be used as a treatment against asthma, bronchitis and dysentery. The leaves and bark are also in good repute as a tonic that is used after labor. The juice of the leaves and fresh bark is used as a remedy for after-pains.

The tree is also used in matchstick industry, as fodder for goats, and is one of the best tree used to trap Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM).

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN