dcsimg

Reproduction

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Nothing is known about the mating system of this species.

Nothing is known about reproduction in A. boliviensis. However, in a related species, A. cinera, the gestation period is approximatley 115 days and there are 1 or 2 young per litter. There is recorded variation in Abrocoma, as A. bennetti can have 4 to 6 per litter.

Breeding interval: Breeding intervals are not known in Bolivian chinchilla rats.

Breeding season: The breeding season of Bolivian chinchilla rats is not known.

Key Reproductive Features: iteroparous ; gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); sexual ; viviparous

There is nothing known about parental investment in this species. Like other mammals, females nourish and care for their young until they are weaned.

Parental Investment: pre-fertilization (Provisioning, Protecting: Female); pre-hatching/birth (Provisioning: Female, Protecting: Female); pre-weaning/fledging (Provisioning: Female)

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Smith, C. 2007. "Abrocoma boliviensis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_boliviensis.html
author
Christian Smith, Michigan State University
editor
Barbara Lundrigan, Michigan State University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Untitled

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Very little study has been done on A. boliviensis. While futher study is warranted, it has been suggested that due to their diet of leaves, buds, and bark, these animals will prove difficult to trap using standard trapping techniques. (Glanz, 1990)

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Smith, C. 2007. "Abrocoma boliviensis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_boliviensis.html
author
Christian Smith, Michigan State University
editor
Barbara Lundrigan, Michigan State University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Behavior

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Nothing is known about communication and perception in this species. Like other rodents, they are likely to use olfaction extensively in communication and perception.

Communication Channels: chemical

Perception Channels: visual ; tactile ; acoustic ; chemical

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Smith, C. 2007. "Abrocoma boliviensis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_boliviensis.html
author
Christian Smith, Michigan State University
editor
Barbara Lundrigan, Michigan State University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Conservation Status

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Bolivian chinchilla rats are listed as vulnerable on the IUCN red list of threatened species. Data on populations and ecological requirements are extremely limited and they are also designated "data deficient."

US Federal List: no special status

CITES: no special status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: critically endangered

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Smith, C. 2007. "Abrocoma boliviensis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_boliviensis.html
author
Christian Smith, Michigan State University
editor
Barbara Lundrigan, Michigan State University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Benefits

provided by Animal Diversity Web

There are no known adverse effects of Bolivian chinchilla rats on humans.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Smith, C. 2007. "Abrocoma boliviensis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_boliviensis.html
author
Christian Smith, Michigan State University
editor
Barbara Lundrigan, Michigan State University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Benefits

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Being very much like chinchilla fur, Abrocoma fur is sold at market for a small profit.

Positive Impacts: body parts are source of valuable material

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Smith, C. 2007. "Abrocoma boliviensis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_boliviensis.html
author
Christian Smith, Michigan State University
editor
Barbara Lundrigan, Michigan State University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Associations

provided by Animal Diversity Web

There is nothing known about the ecosystem role of this species.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Smith, C. 2007. "Abrocoma boliviensis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_boliviensis.html
author
Christian Smith, Michigan State University
editor
Barbara Lundrigan, Michigan State University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Trophic Strategy

provided by Animal Diversity Web

It is not known with certainty what A. boliviensis eats, but it is believed that this species eats many types of plant material. A similiar species, A. bennetti, eats mainly buds, shrubs, and bark.

Plant Foods: leaves; wood, bark, or stems

Primary Diet: herbivore (Folivore , Lignivore)

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Smith, C. 2007. "Abrocoma boliviensis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_boliviensis.html
author
Christian Smith, Michigan State University
editor
Barbara Lundrigan, Michigan State University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Distribution

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Abrocoma boliviensis is restricted to Central Bolivia.

Biogeographic Regions: neotropical (Native )

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Smith, C. 2007. "Abrocoma boliviensis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_boliviensis.html
author
Christian Smith, Michigan State University
editor
Barbara Lundrigan, Michigan State University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Habitat

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Bolivian chinchilla rats have been captured near the Comarapa river valley in the province of Manual M. Caballero. The area was rocky, with small shrubs. The elevation was approximatley 2500 m.

Habitat Regions: tropical ; terrestrial

Terrestrial Biomes: mountains

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Smith, C. 2007. "Abrocoma boliviensis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_boliviensis.html
author
Christian Smith, Michigan State University
editor
Barbara Lundrigan, Michigan State University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Life Expectancy

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Information on A. boliviensis is scarce. However, a Bennett's chinchilla rat, A. bennettii, lived for 2 years and 4 months in captivity.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Smith, C. 2007. "Abrocoma boliviensis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_boliviensis.html
author
Christian Smith, Michigan State University
editor
Barbara Lundrigan, Michigan State University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Morphology

provided by Animal Diversity Web

So few A. boliviensis have been captured that it is difficult to get a meaningful species size average. There is one measurement of an individual being 174 mm in head and body length. The species has been recorded as being generally smaller than A. bennetti, which has a body length of 195 to 250 mm and weighs around 225 g for males and 300 g for females.

Other Physical Features: endothermic ; homoiothermic; bilateral symmetry

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Smith, C. 2007. "Abrocoma boliviensis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_boliviensis.html
author
Christian Smith, Michigan State University
editor
Barbara Lundrigan, Michigan State University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Associations

provided by Animal Diversity Web

While nothing is known about specific predators of A. boliviensis, Lycalopex culpaeus has been found to prey on A. bennetti.

Anti-predator Adaptations: cryptic

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Smith, C. 2007. "Abrocoma boliviensis" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Abrocoma_boliviensis.html
author
Christian Smith, Michigan State University
editor
Barbara Lundrigan, Michigan State University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Bolivian chinchilla rat

provided by wikipedia EN

The Bolivian chinchilla rat (Abrocoma boliviensis) is a species of chinchilla rat in the family Abrocomidae.[2] It is found only in Manuel María Caballero Province, Bolivia. Its natural habitat is the rocky areas of cloud forests in Bolivia's interior.

Habitat and ecology

The Bolivian chinchilla rat lives in the cloud forests of Bolivia, and may specialize in the rocky areas within the cloud forest. It is a herbivore, and lives in burrows. Young are born precocial after a relatively long gestation period.[1]

Threats

"Listed as Critically Endangered because its extent of occurrence is less than 100 km², all individuals are in a single location, and there is continuing decline in the extent and quality of its cloud forest habitat."

Major threats to the Bolivian chinchilla rat include the clearing of its cloud forest habitat for cattle pasture and habitat fragmentation. It was historically trapped for its fur.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c Dunnum, J.; Vargas, J. & Bernal, N. (2008). "Abrocoma boliviensis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2008. Retrieved 5 January 2009.old-form url
  2. ^ Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M., eds. (2005). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press. pp. 1538–1600.
 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Bolivian chinchilla rat: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Bolivian chinchilla rat (Abrocoma boliviensis) is a species of chinchilla rat in the family Abrocomidae. It is found only in Manuel María Caballero Province, Bolivia. Its natural habitat is the rocky areas of cloud forests in Bolivia's interior.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN