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Image of Lesser All-green Leafroller, Four-lined Leafroller
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Lesser All Green Leafroller, Four Lined Leafroller

Argyrotaenia quadrifasciana Fernald 1882

Conservation Status

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Not of concern.
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Cyclicity

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Early July to late August in Alberta, starting in late June elsewhere (Chapman & Lienk 1971).
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Distribution

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From Alberta to Nova Scotia, south to New Jersey, Nebraska, and North Dakota. In Alberta known mostly from the aspen parkland.
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General Description

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"The forewing is bright orange with abundant fine yellow reticulation throughout. In females there is variably expressed thin slanted bands lacking reticulation in the antemedian, postmedian, and apical corner, in males these markings are dark purple. The hindwing is white to light orange in the femal and dark greyish in the male. In the similar Sparganothis reticulatana the forewing is yellow with variable orange reticulation and there is a thin perpendicular line partially or completely connecting the antemedian and postmedian lines. As the common name suggests, the larva is completely green except for a small black spot amongst the eyes and is closely similar to A. velutinana. (Chapman & Lienk 1971)"
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Habitat

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Moderately common in the aspen parkland, especially where cherry shrubs are common.
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Life Cycle

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Eggs are laid on the upper surfaces of leaves in dull greyish yellow masses of about 50 eggs each. Larvae hibernate in a hibernaculum in the thrid instar and resume feeding on the buds in early spring. Later instars produce copious webbing on terminal shoots and rarely stray from it. Pupation occurs on the shelter and lasts up to two weeks. (Chapman & Lienk 1971)
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Trophic Strategy

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Hawthorns (Crataegus spp.), serviceberries (Amelanchier spp.), cherries (Prunus spp.), and apples (Malus spp.) are the main hosts of the larva (MacKay 1962).
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Argyrotaenia quadrifasciana

provided by wikipedia EN

Argyrotaenia quadrifasciana, the four-lined leafroller moth, four-banded leafroller or lesser all-green leafroller, is a species of moth of the family Tortricidae. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from Nova Scotia to West Virginia, west to Arkansas and north to Alberta.[2][3] The habitat consists of orchards and shrubby areas.

The wingspan is about 14–17 mm. The forewings are yellowish-tan, covered with medium reddish-brown blotches and dark reddish-brown lines. The hindwings are yellow to yellowish-brown. Adults have been recorded on wing from May to August in one generation per year.

The larvae feed on the leaves of Amelanchier species (including Amelanchier alnifolia), Crataegus species, Malus sylvestris, Prunus species (including Prunus pensylvanica, Prunus serotina, Prunus virginiana) and Pyrus species.[4] The species overwinters as a third-instar larva.

References

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Argyrotaenia quadrifasciana: Brief Summary

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Argyrotaenia quadrifasciana, the four-lined leafroller moth, four-banded leafroller or lesser all-green leafroller, is a species of moth of the family Tortricidae. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from Nova Scotia to West Virginia, west to Arkansas and north to Alberta. The habitat consists of orchards and shrubby areas.

The wingspan is about 14–17 mm. The forewings are yellowish-tan, covered with medium reddish-brown blotches and dark reddish-brown lines. The hindwings are yellow to yellowish-brown. Adults have been recorded on wing from May to August in one generation per year.

The larvae feed on the leaves of Amelanchier species (including Amelanchier alnifolia), Crataegus species, Malus sylvestris, Prunus species (including Prunus pensylvanica, Prunus serotina, Prunus virginiana) and Pyrus species. The species overwinters as a third-instar larva.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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wikipedia EN