dcsimg

Conservation Status

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Not of concern.
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Cyclicity

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End of April to late June.
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Distribution

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From British Columbia north to the Yukon and Northwest Territories, east to Newfoundland, and south to Kentucky and Oregon. In Alberta found throughout boreal and mountainous regions.
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General Description

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"The forewing is light grey with fine dark grey or black reticulations throughout. Broad bands slanted towards the anal angle are prominent in the basal, median and upper postmedian areas. The head and thorax are dark grey and the abdomen and hindwings are light grey. The larva is green with a darker green middorsal stripe and with some brown markings on the head (Duncan 2006)."
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Habitat

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Spruce forests.
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Life Cycle

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Overwintering is done as a pupa and adults emerge from mid May to late July. Larvae are solitary and web the needles of their hosts (Duncan 2006).
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Trophic Strategy

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Most commonly on spruce (Picea spp.), also Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), Balsam Fir (Abies balsamea), Tamarack (Larix laricina), and Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta)(Duncan 2006; MacKay 1962).
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Argyrotaenia occultana

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Argyrotaenia occultana, the fall spruce needle moth, is a moth of the family Tortricidae. The species was first described by Thomas Nesbitt Freeman in 1942. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from British Columbia north to Yukon and Northwest Territories, east to Newfoundland and south to Kentucky and Oregon.[2] The habitat consists of spruce forests.

The wingspan is about 16 mm. The forewings are light grey with dark grey or black reticulations. The hindwings are light grey. Adults have been recorded on wing from the end of April to late June.

The larvae feed on Betula species, Abies species (including Abies balsamea), Larix species, Picea species (including Picea engelmanni, Picea glauca, Picea mariana, Picea rubens), Pinus contorta, Pseudotsuga menziesii and Tsuga species.[3] They web the needles of their host plant. The larvae are green with a darker green middorsal stripe and with brown markings on the head. The species overwinters in the pupal stage.

References

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Argyrotaenia occultana: Brief Summary

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Argyrotaenia occultana, the fall spruce needle moth, is a moth of the family Tortricidae. The species was first described by Thomas Nesbitt Freeman in 1942. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from British Columbia north to Yukon and Northwest Territories, east to Newfoundland and south to Kentucky and Oregon. The habitat consists of spruce forests.

The wingspan is about 16 mm. The forewings are light grey with dark grey or black reticulations. The hindwings are light grey. Adults have been recorded on wing from the end of April to late June.

The larvae feed on Betula species, Abies species (including Abies balsamea), Larix species, Picea species (including Picea engelmanni, Picea glauca, Picea mariana, Picea rubens), Pinus contorta, Pseudotsuga menziesii and Tsuga species. They web the needles of their host plant. The larvae are green with a darker green middorsal stripe and with brown markings on the head. The species overwinters in the pupal stage.

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