dcsimg

Description

provided by eFloras
Shrubs semievergreen, to 2 m tall. Branchlets dark grayish brown or purplish brown, thin, initially densely white tomentose, glabrescent. Petiole 2–7 mm, tomentose; stipules caducous, linear, pubescent; leaf blade narrowly elliptic, elliptic, or ovate, 2–3(–4) × 0.8–1.5 cm, leathery, midvein impressed adaxially, lateral veins 4–6 pairs, abaxially densely white tomentose, adaxially slightly pubescent or glabrous, base broadly cuneate, apex obtuse or acute. Corymbs 1–3 × 1.5–2.5 cm, to 10(–20)-flowered; rachis and pedicels densely tomentose; bracts caducous, linear, pubescent. Pedicel 2–3 mm. Flowers 7–8 mm in diam. Hypanthium campanulate, abaxially densely tomentose. Sepals triangular, apex shortly acuminate or acute. Petals spreading, white, broadly ovate or suborbicular, 3–3.5 mm, base shortly clawed and puberulous adaxially, apex obtuse. Stamens 20, nearly as long as petals; anthers purplish red. Ovary pubescent apically; styles 2(or 3), free, ca. as long as stamens. Fruit dark red, globose or ovoid, 7–8 mm in diam., pyrenes often 2. Fl. Jun, fr. Oct–Nov. 2n = 34*, 68*.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 9: 92 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Distribution

provided by eFloras
Sichuan, Yunnan.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 9: 92 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Habitat

provided by eFloras
Thickets, rocky places, waste places in mountain regions, slopes; 1100--3200 m.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 9: 92 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Derivation of specific name

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
pannosus: appearance or texture of felt, referring to the underside of the leaves
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Cotoneaster pannosus Franch. Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/species.php?species_id=125330
author
Mark Hyde
author
Bart Wursten
author
Petra Ballings
original
visit source
partner site
Flora of Zimbabwe

Description

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
Shrub, to 3 m. Leaves alternate, dark dull green and hairless above, densely white-tomentose beneath. Flowers in terminal and axillary heads, white. Fruit a red berry.
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Cotoneaster pannosus Franch. Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/species.php?species_id=125330
author
Mark Hyde
author
Bart Wursten
author
Petra Ballings
original
visit source
partner site
Flora of Zimbabwe

Frequency

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
Common in and near Harare; local elsewhere
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Cotoneaster pannosus Franch. Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/species.php?species_id=125330
author
Mark Hyde
author
Bart Wursten
author
Petra Ballings
original
visit source
partner site
Flora of Zimbabwe

Worldwide distribution

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
Native to China; naturalised elsewhere, e.g. in Zimbabwe and S Africa
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
bibliographic citation
Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Cotoneaster pannosus Franch. Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/species.php?species_id=125330
author
Mark Hyde
author
Bart Wursten
author
Petra Ballings
original
visit source
partner site
Flora of Zimbabwe

Cotoneaster pannosus

provided by wikipedia EN

Cotoneaster pannosus is a species of Cotoneaster known by the common name silverleaf cotoneaster. This woody shrub is native to south central China[1] but it has been introduced to other areas of the world, including southern Africa and Australia as an ornamental. It has become naturalized in some areas but it is a troublesome noxious weed in others, for example, in Hawaii. This is a sprawling shrub easily reaching over 3 meters in height. It is covered in dull green oval-shaped leaves with fuzzy white undersides and blooms in white flowers. The fruits are red-orange pomes containing two seeds each. These fruits are very attractive to birds, which are the main agent of seed dispersal. It grows on the elevation of 3,280 feet (1,000 m).[2]

Invasiveness

It is considered to be an invasive species in California[2] and Oregon.[3]

References

  1. ^ "Flora of China entry for Cotoneaster" (PDF). 2003. pp. 85–108.
  2. ^ a b "Cotoneaster pannosus". Calflora. Retrieved April 9, 2013.
  3. ^ "Cotoneaster pannosus Franch. silverleaf cotoneaster". USDA. Plants Profile. Retrieved April 9, 2013.

 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Cotoneaster pannosus: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Cotoneaster pannosus is a species of Cotoneaster known by the common name silverleaf cotoneaster. This woody shrub is native to south central China but it has been introduced to other areas of the world, including southern Africa and Australia as an ornamental. It has become naturalized in some areas but it is a troublesome noxious weed in others, for example, in Hawaii. This is a sprawling shrub easily reaching over 3 meters in height. It is covered in dull green oval-shaped leaves with fuzzy white undersides and blooms in white flowers. The fruits are red-orange pomes containing two seeds each. These fruits are very attractive to birds, which are the main agent of seed dispersal. It grows on the elevation of 3,280 feet (1,000 m).

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN