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Biology

provided by Arctic Ocean Biodiversity 2011
The most widespread Arctic krill
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cc-by-nc
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Arctic Ocean Diversity
author
Alexei Pinchuk
author
Russ Hopcroft

Comprehensive Description

provided by Arctic Ocean Biodiversity 2011
Transparent, yellowish if rich in lipids, females might develop blue hue when spawning; Eyes round, rostrum pointed, photophores red; Anntennae lack lappet, carapace with 1 small denticle; abdomen without keel-spines
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cc-by-nc
copyright
Arctic Ocean Diversity
author
Alexei Pinchuk
author
Russ Hopcroft

Habitat

provided by Arctic Ocean Biodiversity 2011
Panarctic and subarctic in coastal waters (above 200m); Can be abundant in coastal embayments; Most common in Arctic waters near Pacific or Atlantic inflows, uncommon in central basins; Undergo diel vertical migrations, spending daytime near bottom, night-time in surface waters
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cc-by-nc
copyright
Arctic Ocean Diversity
author
Alexei Pinchuk
author
Russ Hopcroft

Life Cycle

provided by Arctic Ocean Biodiversity 2011
Females lay several clutches of eggs during summer; Females require repeated mating after each molt to form new egg clutches; Life cycles is typcial: eggs, nauplius, metanauplius, followed by several stages of feeding calytopsis, and furcillia larvae; Juveniles resemble adults, and molt regularly while growing to adulthood over the first year of life; Life expectancy not known, likely 2-3 years
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
Arctic Ocean Diversity
author
Alexei Pinchuk
author
Russ Hopcroft

Trophic Strategy

provided by Arctic Ocean Biodiversity 2011
Primarily herbivourous, may feed on detritous when food is scarse - known to feed directly on under-ice algae; During open-water periods feed on phytoplankton when abundant (shifting to small zooplankton when phyoplankton less abundant); An important prey item for fish, birds, seals and whales
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
Arctic Ocean Diversity
author
Alexei Pinchuk
author
Russ Hopcroft

Diagnostic Description

provided by iArczoo

Differs from other Thysanoessa species by the presence of 2 spines on the sides of the carapace

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cc-by-3.0
compiler
Ershova, Elizaveta
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iArczoo

Distribution

provided by iArczoo

Amphiboreal species; found in the Barents Sea, White Sea, Kara Sea, Bering Sea, Sea of Okhotsk, Chukchi Sea.

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cc-by-3.0
compiler
Ershova, Elizaveta
partner site
iArczoo

Morphology

provided by iArczoo

The lateral edges of the carapace carry a small spine on each side. The last segment of the abdomen does not carry a spine.

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cc-by-3.0
compiler
Ershova, Elizaveta
partner site
iArczoo

Size

provided by iArczoo

Length up to 30 mm.

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cc-by-3.0
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Ershova, Elizaveta
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iArczoo

Thysanoessa raschii

provided by wikipedia EN

Thysanoessa raschii, sometimes known as Arctic krill, is one of the most common euphausiid species of the subarctic and Arctic seas. They may reach 20–25 millimetres (0.8–1.0 in) long, and are sexually mature above 14 mm (0.6 in).[1]

T. raschii is a major prey item of several taxa, planktivorous fishes and marine mammals. It is also a common prey item of seabirds, including shearwaters.[2]

This species goes through a number of stages in its development. Roderick Macdonald defined the characteristics of fourteen stages, or 'furcilia'.[3]

References

  1. ^ M. J. de Kluijver & S. S. Ingalsuo. "Thysanoessa raschii". Macrobenthos of the North Sea. Universiteit van Amsterdam. Archived from the original on July 17, 2011. Retrieved December 7, 2006.
  2. ^ J. R. Lovvorn; C. L. Baduini & G. L. Hunt (2001). "Modelling underwater visual and filter feeding by planktivorous shearwaters in unusual sea conditions". Ecology. 82 (8): 2342–2356. doi:10.1890/0012-9658(2001)082[2342:MUVAFF]2.0.CO;2. ISSN 0012-9658.
  3. ^ R. Macdonald (1928). "The life history of Thysanoessa raschii". Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. 15 (1): 57–80. doi:10.1017/S0025315400055533. Archived from the original on 2007-03-11.
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Wikipedia authors and editors
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wikipedia EN

Thysanoessa raschii: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Thysanoessa raschii, sometimes known as Arctic krill, is one of the most common euphausiid species of the subarctic and Arctic seas. They may reach 20–25 millimetres (0.8–1.0 in) long, and are sexually mature above 14 mm (0.6 in).

T. raschii is a major prey item of several taxa, planktivorous fishes and marine mammals. It is also a common prey item of seabirds, including shearwaters.

This species goes through a number of stages in its development. Roderick Macdonald defined the characteristics of fourteen stages, or 'furcilia'.

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cc-by-sa-3.0
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Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Habitat

provided by World Register of Marine Species
upper and glacial of the Gulf and estuary
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cc-by-4.0
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WoRMS Editorial Board
bibliographic citation
Kylin, H. (1956). Die Gattungen der Rhodophyceen. C.W.K. Gleerup: Lund, Sweden. xv, 673 pp. Mauchline, J. and Fisher, L.R. (1969) The Biology of Euphausiids. Advances in Marine Biology 7: 1-454 Brinton E (1962). The distribution of Pacific euphausiids. Bull. Scipps Inst. Oceanography, 8 (1): 51-269 North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
contributor
Mary Kennedy [email]

distribution

provided by World Register of Marine Species
depth in m: 0-200; horizontal distribution: amphiboreal species, N Atlantic, N Pacific
license
cc-by-4.0
copyright
WoRMS Editorial Board
bibliographic citation
Kylin, H. (1956). Die Gattungen der Rhodophyceen. C.W.K. Gleerup: Lund, Sweden. xv, 673 pp. Mauchline, J. and Fisher, L.R. (1969) The Biology of Euphausiids. Advances in Marine Biology 7: 1-454 Brinton E (1962). The distribution of Pacific euphausiids. Bull. Scipps Inst. Oceanography, 8 (1): 51-269 North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
contributor
Siegel, Volker, V.