Pocilloporidae

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The Pocilloporidae are a family of stony corals in the order Scleractinia occurring in the Pacific and Indian Oceans.

Description

Pocilloporids are colonial and most species are reef-building. They are very variable in size and shape, some being submassive and others arborescent or ramose. The corallites are small and vary from being sunken to being raised cones. The columellae are well developed and the septa may be fused with them. The coenosteum lining the skeleton is covered with spinules. The Pocilloporidae are closely related to the other coral families, Astrocoeniidae and Acroporidae.[1]

Biology

The genera in this family are polymorphic, differing in growth form according to their habitat, but showing similar growth forms in response to light availability and wave action. The colonies are hermaphrodites. The sperm is liberated into the sea and finds its way into other polyps. After internal fertilisation, the planula larvae are brooded by the parent before being ejected into the water column. This means the dispersal distances are small, but the likelihood of finding a suitable substrate on which to settle are raised.[2]

Genera

The World Register of Marine Species lists these genera in the family:-[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c Hoeksema, Bert (2010). "Pocilloporidae". WoRMS. World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved 2015-04-22.
  2. ^ Pocillopora inflata IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 2011-12-23.
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Pocilloporidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Pocilloporidae are a family of stony corals in the order Scleractinia occurring in the Pacific and Indian Oceans.

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cc-by-sa-3.0
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Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
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wikipedia EN

Description

provided by World Register of Marine Species
All genera in this family are highly polymorphic and all show similar growth forms in response to wave action and light availability. Most species brood planula larvae after internal fertilisation rather than release gametes into the water. They brood at regular or irregular intervals throughout the year. Mature colonies are hermaphrodite. Colonial and mostly hermatypic. Colonies are submassive, ramose or arborescent. Corallites are immersed to conical, small, have well-developed columellae and neatly arranged septa of two cycles or less, some usually fused with the columella. The coenosteum is covered with spinules. Related families are Astrocoeniidae and Acroporidae.(Veron, 1986 <57>).
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bibliographic citation
MASDEA (1997).
contributor
Edward Vanden Berghe [email]