Diagnostic Description

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Brownish or grayish above, whitish below; caudal fin 2-3 horizontal black stripes (Ref. 4315). Head strongly depressed. Preopercular spines 2, lower usually longest. Vomerine teeth in a single transverse band. Dorsal fin I,VII,I, I,I,VII,I or I,VIII, 13. Anteriormost lateral line scale usually with a small spine or ridge. Diagonal scale rows slanting backward above lateral line 83-107. Iris lappet a single elongated lobe. Identified by the distinctive color pattern on the caudal fin: centrally yellow and black stripes on upper and lower margins (Ref. 48635).
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Recorder
Crispina B. Binohlan
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Diseases and Parasites

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Procerovum Infestation 1. Parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.)
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Recorder
Allan Palacio
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Diseases and Parasites

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Procamallanus Infection 2. Parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.)
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Allan Palacio
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Life Cycle

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Also Ref. 103751.
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Susan M. Luna
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Migration

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Oceanodromous. Migrating within oceans typically between spawning and different feeding areas, as tunas do. Migrations should be cyclical and predictable and cover more than 100 km.
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Rainer Froese
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Morphology

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Dorsal spines (total): 9 - 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 13; Analspines: 0; Analsoft rays: 13
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Crispina B. Binohlan
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Trophic Strategy

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Found inshore (Ref. 75154).
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Pascualita Sa-a
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Biology

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Found on sandy and muddy bottoms of coastal waters (Ref. 5213, 48635). Frequently in estuaries, juveniles have been taken in freshwater. Taken by handlining and seining in shallow waters and by trawling at depths to 30 m, usually less (Ref. 9790). A good food fish (Ref. 4315) that is marketed fresh (Ref. 5284). Commercially cultured in Japan. Used in Chinese medicine (Ref. 12166).
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Importance

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fisheries: commercial; aquaculture: commercial; gamefish: yes
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Rainer Froese
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分布

provided by The Fish Database of Taiwan
分布於印度-西太平洋區海域,由紅海及東非到菲律賓,北至日本南部與韓國,南至澳洲北部。臺灣各地沙泥底海域均有分布。
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臺灣魚類資料庫
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利用

provided by The Fish Database of Taiwan
漁期全年皆有,可利用手釣、圍網、底拖網、延繩釣等漁法捕獲。本種魚體型較大,魚市場較常見。其肉質細緻味美,是不錯的食用魚,油煎、清蒸或煮清湯。日本已有商業性的養殖。
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描述

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背鰭鰭條I-VII-I, 13或I-I-VII-I, 13;臀鰭鰭條13;胸鰭鰭條18-21(主要18);腹鰭鰭條I, 5;尾鰭分叉鰭條9-12(主要12)。側線鱗68-77;鰓被架7。體較短,平扁,向後漸細尖,縱剖面略呈圓柱狀。頭部呈縱扁,眶間隔稍寬。吻平扁,略長,約為眼徑之1.3-1.9倍。頭長為吻長之3.6-3.8倍。口大,上位,向後延伸超過眼睛前緣。眼小,眼後無凹陷。體長為頭長之2.9-3.2倍。鋤骨齒單一叢,寬帶狀。頤部具不具側線管。眼上方具有許多細絲。間鰓蓋骨不具附肢。頰部具雙稜。眼下稜光滑,僅1棘。前鰓蓋骨上方具2棘,下棘長於上棘,不具向前之倒棘。虹膜垂簡單型(simple)。眼眶前具1棘或無。眼眶上方具1棘。側線鱗具單一開口,均無棘。體背褐色,其上分布著黑褐色的不規則小斑點,腹部為淡黃色。背鰭、胸鰭及腹鰭均有些棕色的小斑點;尾鰭中間黃色,具有3-4黑色橫帶,各黑帶具白緣,是此魚重要的特徵。台灣標本存在有兩種型態,主要差別在鰓耙數量,有待進一步研究。(何宣慶、林沛立編寫 2012/12)
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棲地

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底棲性,主要棲息於沿岸沙泥底海域,但常可見於河口域,稚魚甚至可生活於河川下游。肉食性,以底棲性魚類或無脊椎動物為食。利用體色之擬態隱身於沙泥地,用以欺敵以及趁獵物不注意時躍起捕食。
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Bartail flathead

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The bartail flathead (Platycephalus indicus), also called the bar-tailed flathead, bartail blenny, gobi, Indian flathead or the Indo-Pacific flathead,[3] is the type species for the fish genus Platycephalus.[4] It is found in the Indian Ocean and western Pacific Ocean.[3] The species has been recorded in the Mediterranean, having invaded as a Lessepsian migrant through the Suez Canal.[5] However, although a number of specimens were caught in trawls in the late 1970s[6] then none were caught until 2011, when one was taken off Lebanon.[7] Following the revision of genus Platycephalus in Australia, Australian specimens previously assigned to this species are now considered a separate species, Platycephalus australis.[8]

Platycephalus indicus grow to a maximum length of 100 cm (39 in) TL, although they are commonly smaller, to 60 cm (24 in) TL. They live on sandy and muddy bottoms of coastal waters, including estuaries, and juveniles have even been taken in freshwater. It is a commercial fish species.[3]

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Caudal fin

References

  1. ^ Knapp, L.W. (2010). "Platycephalus indicus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2010: e.T155105A4708518. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2010-4.RLTS.T155105A4708518.en.
  2. ^ N. Bailly (2017). "Platycephalus indicus (Linnaeus, 1758)". World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved 15 April 2017.
  3. ^ a b c Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2014). "Platycephalus indicus" in FishBase. November 2014 version.
  4. ^ Eschmeyer, W. N. (7 January 2015). "Catalog of Fishes". California Academy of Sciences. Archived from the original on 3 May 2015. Retrieved 15 January 2015.
  5. ^ Rodríguez, G.; Suárez, H. (2001). "Anthropogenic dispersal of decapod crustaceans in aquatic environments". Interciencia. 26 (7): 282–288. Archived from the original on 2012-12-25.
  6. ^ "Platycephalus indicus". CIESM Atlas of Exotic Fishes in the Mediterranean Sea. CIESM. Retrieved 15 January 2017.
  7. ^ Michel Bariche (2012). "Recent evidence on the presence of Heniochus intermedius (Teleostei: Chaetodontidae) and Platycephalus indicus (Teleostei: Platycephalidae) in the Mediterranean Sea" (PDF). BioInvasions Records. 1 (1): 53–57. doi:10.3391/bir.2012.1.1.12.
  8. ^ Imamura, H. (2015): Taxonomic revision of the flathead fish genus Platycephalus Bloch, 1785 (Teleostei: Platycephalidae) from Australia, with description of a new species. Zootaxa, 3904 (2): 151–207.

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Bartail flathead: Brief Summary

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The bartail flathead (Platycephalus indicus), also called the bar-tailed flathead, bartail blenny, gobi, Indian flathead or the Indo-Pacific flathead, is the type species for the fish genus Platycephalus. It is found in the Indian Ocean and western Pacific Ocean. The species has been recorded in the Mediterranean, having invaded as a Lessepsian migrant through the Suez Canal. However, although a number of specimens were caught in trawls in the late 1970s then none were caught until 2011, when one was taken off Lebanon. Following the revision of genus Platycephalus in Australia, Australian specimens previously assigned to this species are now considered a separate species, Platycephalus australis.

Platycephalus indicus grow to a maximum length of 100 cm (39 in) TL, although they are commonly smaller, to 60 cm (24 in) TL. They live on sandy and muddy bottoms of coastal waters, including estuaries, and juveniles have even been taken in freshwater. It is a commercial fish species.

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Description

provided by World Register of Marine Species
Found on sandy and muddy bottoms of coastal waters (Ref. 5213). Frequently in estuaries, juveniles have been taken in freshwater. Taken by handlining and seining in shallow waters and by trawling at depths to 30 m, usually less (Ref. 9790). Commercially cultured in Japan. Marketed fresh (Ref. 5284).
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bibliographic citation
Bariche, M. (2012). Recent evidence on the presence of Heniochus intermedius (Teleostei: Chaetodontidae) and Platycephalus indicus (Teleostei: Platycephalidae) in the Mediterranean Sea. BioInvasions Records 1(1): 53-57. Bariche, M. (2012). Recent evidence on the presence of Heniochus intermedius (Teleostei: Chaetodontidae) and Platycephalus indicus (Teleostei: Platycephalidae) in the Mediterranean Sea. BioInvasions Records 1(1): 53-57. Froese, R. & D. Pauly (Editors). (2021). FishBase. World Wide Web electronic publication. version (02/2021). Katsanevakis, S.; Bogucarskis, K.; Gatto, F.; Vandekerkhove, J.; Deriu, I.; Cardoso A.S. (2012). Building the European Alien Species Information Network (EASIN): a novel approach for the exploration of distributed alien species data. <em>BioInvasions Records.</em> 1: 235-245. Ben-Tuvia, A. (1953). Mediterranean fishes of Israel. <em>Bulletin of the Sea Fisheries Research Station, Haifa.</em> 8: 1-40.
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