Life Cycle

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Nests are constructed beneath boulders where the dense gelatinous cluster of about 10,000 eggs are deposited. The male stands guard and seals the nest from the inside by blocking the entrance with small stones and mud. Eggs hatch after about ten days into planktonic larvae (Ref. 9003).
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Susan M. Luna
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Morphology

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Dorsal spines (total): 20; Dorsal soft rays (total): 4; Analspines: 9; Analsoft rays: 4
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Crispina B. Binohlan
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Trophic Strategy

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A resident intertidal species with homing behavior (Ref. 32612) found in pools with rocks or boulders. May leave tidepools if aquatic conditions become inhospitable (Ref. 31184). Feeds mostly on invertebrates, particularly crustaceans and mollusks.
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Drina Sta. Iglesia
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Biology

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Are residents of intertidal zone with homing behavior (Ref. 32612) found in pools with rocks or boulders. May leave tide pools if aquatic conditions become inhospitable (Ref. 31184). Feed mostly on invertebrates, particularly crustaceans and mollusks. They breathe air when out of water (Ref. 31184) and swim with an eel-like motion (Ref. 9003). Eggs are guarded by the male parent (Ref. 205).
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Importance

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fisheries: of no interest
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Olive rockfish

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The olive rockfish, Acanthoclinus fuscus, is a longfin of the family Plesiopidae. Found only in New Zealand's intertidal zone and in rock pools at low tide, the fish grow to a length of up to 30 cm (12 in). They are permanent inhabitants of the intertidal zone, which demonstrate homing behaviour, and are found in pools among rocks or boulders. If the conditions in these pools become unsuitable they may leave the pools. Their diet consists mostly of invertebrates, mainly crustaceans and molluscs. They are able to breathe air. This species swims with a sinuous motion similar to an eel. The male guards the eggs.[1]olive rockfish are black with a distinctive white band on the head.[1]

References

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2018). "Acanthoclinus fuscus" in FishBase. June 2018 version.
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Olive rockfish: Brief Summary

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The olive rockfish, Acanthoclinus fuscus, is a longfin of the family Plesiopidae. Found only in New Zealand's intertidal zone and in rock pools at low tide, the fish grow to a length of up to 30 cm (12 in). They are permanent inhabitants of the intertidal zone, which demonstrate homing behaviour, and are found in pools among rocks or boulders. If the conditions in these pools become unsuitable they may leave the pools. Their diet consists mostly of invertebrates, mainly crustaceans and molluscs. They are able to breathe air. This species swims with a sinuous motion similar to an eel. The male guards the eggs.olive rockfish are black with a distinctive white band on the head.[1]

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