dcsimg

Description

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Varieties 2 (1 in the flora): North America; Asia.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 3 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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Description

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Herbs perennial. Roots fibrous, subequally thick. Stems (10--)15--25 cm, sparsely sericeous, branched. Basal and lower stem leaves long petiolate; petiole 2--4.5 cm, sparsely sericeous; blade 3-partite near base, reniform-pentagonal or suborbicular, 1--1.7 × 1.7--2.6 cm, papery, sparsely sericeous, base cordate, central segment rhombic-cuneate, 3-lobed or 3-partite, lobes oblong or linear; lateral segments obliquely flabellate, unequally 2-partite, upper lobe smaller, 3-lobed, lower lobe unequally 3-partite, lobules linear. Upper stem leaves sessile, palmatisect, segments linear. Flowers solitary, terminal, 1.4--1.9 cm in diam. Receptacle densely puberulent. Sepals 5, broadly ovate, ca. 5 mm, abaxially pubescent. Petals 5, broadly obovate, 6--10 × 7--10 mm, nectary pit without a scale, apex rounded-truncate. Stamens numerous; anthers oblong. Aggregate fruit cylindric, 8--10 × 5--6 mm. Achene slightly bilaterally compressed, obovoid, 1.5--2 × 1.2--1.7 mm, puberulent or glabrous; style persistent, 0.4--0.7 mm. Fl. Jun--Aug, fr. Jun--Sep.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 6: 400 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Distribution

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Gansu (Yuzhong Xian), SW Nei Mongol, Xinjiang [Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Russia (W Siberia)].
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 6: 400 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
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eFloras

Habitat

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Meadows, forests; 1900--4000 m.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 6: 400 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Ranunculus pedatifidus

provided by wikipedia EN

Ranunculus pedatifidus is a species of buttercup known by the common names surefoot buttercup,[1] northern buttercup, and birdfoot buttercup. It has a circumpolar distribution, occurring throughout the northern latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere.[2] There are two varieties, var. pedatifidus occurring mostly in Asia and var. affinis mostly native to North America.[3]

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R. pedatifidus in Svalbard, Norway

This plant is a perennial herb producing several erect stems up to about 46 centimeters in maximum height, each bearing one or more flowers. The leaf blades are divided into several pointed lobes which are entire or subdivided. The herbage is often very hairy. The flowers have up to 10 yellow petals, though some lack petals. The achenes develop in a cylindrical head.[3][4] The variety affinis is usually a more robust plant, and the leaf segments are usually not subdivided into smaller lobes.[3]

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R. pedatifidus in Alaska, USA

In North America, this species occurs in the Arctic, and farther to the south in alpine climates. It can be found throughout Canada north and south of the Arctic Circle, and down through the Pacific Northwest and Rocky Mountains in the United States. Its habitat includes Arctic and alpine tundra.[2][4]

References

  1. ^ "Ranunculus pedatifidus". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  2. ^ a b Williams, Tara Y. 1990. Ranunculus pedatifidus. In: Fire Effects Information System, [Online]. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory.
  3. ^ a b c Ranunculus pedatifidus var. affinis. Flora of North America.
  4. ^ a b Scott, P. J., et al. 2000 onwards. Ranunculus pedatifidus var. affinis. Ranunculaceae of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago: Descriptions, Illustrations, Identification, and Information Retrieval. Version: 6 November 2000.

 title=
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Wikipedia authors and editors
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Ranunculus pedatifidus: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Ranunculus pedatifidus is a species of buttercup known by the common names surefoot buttercup, northern buttercup, and birdfoot buttercup. It has a circumpolar distribution, occurring throughout the northern latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. There are two varieties, var. pedatifidus occurring mostly in Asia and var. affinis mostly native to North America.

 src= R. pedatifidus in Svalbard, Norway

This plant is a perennial herb producing several erect stems up to about 46 centimeters in maximum height, each bearing one or more flowers. The leaf blades are divided into several pointed lobes which are entire or subdivided. The herbage is often very hairy. The flowers have up to 10 yellow petals, though some lack petals. The achenes develop in a cylindrical head. The variety affinis is usually a more robust plant, and the leaf segments are usually not subdivided into smaller lobes.

 src= R. pedatifidus in Alaska, USA

In North America, this species occurs in the Arctic, and farther to the south in alpine climates. It can be found throughout Canada north and south of the Arctic Circle, and down through the Pacific Northwest and Rocky Mountains in the United States. Its habitat includes Arctic and alpine tundra.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
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wikipedia EN