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Chinese White Olive

Canarium album (Lour.) Räusch.

Description

provided by eFloras
Trees, 7-25(-35) m tall. Branchlets 5-6 mm in diam., tomentose with yellowish brown hairs when young, glabrescent. Leaves stipulate; leaflets 3-6 pairs; blades lanceolate, elliptic, or ovate, 6-14 × 2-5.5 cm, glabrous or abaxially sparsely setose on veins, base rounded or obliquely cuneate, margin entire, apex acuminate with acumen up to ca. 2 cm; lateral veins 12-16 pairs. Inflorescences axillary, minutely tomentose or glabrescent. Male flowers numerous in cymose panicles 15-30 cm; female inflorescence racemose, with less than 8 flowers. Calyx 2.5-3 mm, 3-fid in male flowers, nearly truncate in female flowers. Stamens glabrous; filaments connate for more than 1/2 of length; disk globose or terete and slightly 6-lobed in male flowers, annular, thick and fleshy, with 3 shallowly sinuate teeth and adaxially somewhat pubescent in female flowers. Infructescences 1.5-15 cm, with 1-6 fruits; persistent calyx flat, ca. 5 mm in diam., with recurved lobes. Drupe ovoid or spindle-shaped, 25-35 mm, yellow-green, glabrous; exocarp thick, wrinkled when dry; pyrene acuminate. Fl. Apr-May, fr. Oct-Dec.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 11: 108 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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eFloras.org
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Distribution

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Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hainan, Sichuan, Taiwan, Yunnan [Vietnam].
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 11: 108 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Habitat

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Forests on slopes, valleys, also cultivated; 100-1300 m.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 11: 108 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Synonym

provided by eFloras
Pimela alba Loureiro, Fl. Cochinch. 2: 408. 1790.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 11: 108 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Brief Summary

provided by EOL authors

Canarium album is known as the Chinese olive tree, an evergreen tree in the Burseraceae family that grows to 30 m (100 ft) tall in primary and secondary forests of China, Japan, Malaysia, Vietnam and Laos. It is a hardy species, cited as growing in various conditions, including saline or alkaline soils and rocky hillsides. The Chinese olive tree is extensively cultivated in China, as it produces an edible drupe fruit sold fresh in markets and eaten much as olives are.It is considered a digestive aid and used to regain sobriety, and it is dried as a traditional anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-inflammatory medicinal agent.Its fragrant, sticky sap is also harvested for incense.The bark and leaves have been analyzed and found to have high levels of antioxidants, which may have medical value (BIOTIK 2006-08; Zhejiang 2008).

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Dana Campbell
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Canarium album

provided by wikipedia EN

Canarium album[2] is a tree species in the genus Canarium and the family Burseraceae, found in Indo-China; the Catalogue of Life does not record any sub-species.[2]

Canarium album produces a fruit - sometimes called an "olive" or "white olive",[3] but no relation to Olea; it is consumed in Vietnam (Vietnamese: trám trắng, fruit quả trám), Thailand (where it is known as nam liap (Thai: หนำเลี้ยบ), samo chin (Thai: สมอจีน) or kana (Thai: กาน้า)) and in China (Simplified Chinese: 橄榄; Traditional Chinese: 橄欖; Pinyin" gǎn lǎn ).[4]

The pulp of the tree's fruit and its seeds are edible, with a strong resinous flavor when they are fresh. Culinary oil can be extracted from the seed. Preserves can be made with the fruit, both sweet like jam or pickled preserves. Mostly cultivated in Thailand, cultivation has been introduced on a smaller scale to Fiji and northern Queensland in Australia. Its fruit, resin and seed are exported to Europe where they are used in the manufacture of varnish and soap.[5]

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References

  1. ^ The Plant List (retrieved 14 December 2017)
  2. ^ a b Roskov Y.; Kunze T.; Orrell T.; Abucay L.; Paglinawan L.; Culham A.; Bailly N.; Kirk P.; Bourgoin T.; Baillargeon G.; Decock W.; De Wever A. (2014). Didžiulis V. (ed.). "Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life: 2014 Annual Checklist". Species 2000: Reading, UK. Retrieved 14 December 2017.
  3. ^ GRIN: Canarium album (retrieved 14 December 2017)
  4. ^ Lars Ragvald, Wai-Ling Ragvald & Susanna Björverud, Norstedts Kinesisk-Svenska Ordbok (Stockholm: Norstedt, 2012).
  5. ^ Janick, Jules (ed.). The Encyclopedia of Fruit and Nuts. Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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wikipedia EN

Canarium album: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Canarium album is a tree species in the genus Canarium and the family Burseraceae, found in Indo-China; the Catalogue of Life does not record any sub-species.

Canarium album produces a fruit - sometimes called an "olive" or "white olive", but no relation to Olea; it is consumed in Vietnam (Vietnamese: trám trắng, fruit quả trám), Thailand (where it is known as nam liap (Thai: หนำเลี้ยบ), samo chin (Thai: สมอจีน) or kana (Thai: กาน้า)) and in China (Simplified Chinese: 橄榄; Traditional Chinese: 橄欖; Pinyin" gǎn lǎn ).

The pulp of the tree's fruit and its seeds are edible, with a strong resinous flavor when they are fresh. Culinary oil can be extracted from the seed. Preserves can be made with the fruit, both sweet like jam or pickled preserves. Mostly cultivated in Thailand, cultivation has been introduced on a smaller scale to Fiji and northern Queensland in Australia. Its fruit, resin and seed are exported to Europe where they are used in the manufacture of varnish and soap.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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wikipedia EN