dcsimg

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The somewhat viscid-resinous heads of Solidago simplex are its most distinctive feature, separating it from similar sympatric species. G. S. Ringius (1985) did a detailed multivariate analysis of the S. spathulata/S. simplex complex (the latter under the name S. glutinosa). The cytogeography of the species complex was presented by Ringius and J. C. Semple (1987). Neither study included data on the next three species occurring in the southeastern United States.

The species is divided into two subspecies and seven varieties following G. S Ringius (1985) and J. C. Semple et al. (1999). Three varieties occur in the diploid transcontinental subsp. simplex: var. simplex, var. nana, and var. chlorolepis. Four varieties occur in the eastern North American tetraploid-hexaploid subsp. randii: var. monticola, var. gillmanii, var. ontarioensis, and var. racemosa. Except for var. simplex, varieties are restricted to different habitats in relatively limited ranges.

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Flora of North America Vol. 20: 112,113, 116 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Description

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Plants 5–80 cm; caudices branching. Stems 1–10+, ascending to erect, proximally glabrous, strigose in arrays. Leaves: basal and proximal cauline petiolate, blades narrowly oblanceolate, (20–)50–100(–160) × (2–)5–16(–56) mm, margins serrate to crenate, apices acute to ob-tuse, glabrous; mid and distal sessile, similar, blades lanceolate to linear, 12–45 × 2–19 mm, reduced distally, margins entire to sparsely serrate, sometimes resinous. Heads 3–150, not secund, in narrowly elongate, paniculiform arrays, broadly so in robust plants (12.5–19 × 2.5–3 cm wide), consisting of short axillary and terminal racemiform clusters, proximal branches elongate in larger plants, branches glabrate to strigillose. Peduncles 3.1–10.3 mm, glabrate to sparsely strigillose; bracteoles few, linear. Involucres campanulate, 3–7 mm. Phyllaries (in 3–4 series) strongly unequal, often resinous; outer ovate, acute, inner linear-oblong, obtuse. Ray florets 7–16; laminae 2–5 × 0.7–0.9 mm. Disc florets 6–31; corollas 4–4.9 mm, lobes 0.6–1.3(–2) mm. Cypselae narrowly obconic, 1.9–3.2 mm, sometimes with dark ridges, strigillose; pappi 1.9–5.2 mm (bristles sometimes clavate).
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 20: 112,113, 116 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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eFloras.org
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Conservation Status

provided by Indiana Dunes LifeDesk
The related entities and synonyms italicized and indented below are listed by the U.S. federal government or a state. Common names are from state and federal lists. In Indiana Solidago simplex ssp. randii var. gillmanii, sticky goldenrod is listed as Threatened. In Kentucky Solidago simplex ssp. randii, Rand's goldenrod is listed as Special Concern. In Maryland Solidago spathulata, riverbank goldenrod is listed as Threatened. In Massachusetts Solidago simplex ssp. randii, Rand's goldenrod is listed as Endangered. In New York Solidago simplex ssp. randii var. racemosa, mountain goldenrod is listed as Endangered and Solidago simplex ssp. randii var. randii, mountain goldenrod is listed as Threatened. In Pennsylvania Solidago spathulata var. racemosa, sticky goldenrod is listed as Endangered. In Tennessee Solidago simplex ssp. randii, sticky goldenrod is listed as Threatened. In Wisconsin Solidago simplex ssp. randii var. gillmanii, sticky goldenrod is listed as Threatened. (USDA PLANTS, 2009)
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Cyclicity

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Bloom time is June-September. (NPIN, 2007)
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Distribution

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This plant ranges from Alaska to California, east to Minnesota and Texas. (WTU, 2009) The native distribution ranges from Canada south to central California coast, and in mountains to Arizona and New Mexico. It also occurs in the eastern United States. (NPIN, 2007)

USA: AK , AZ , CA , CO , ID , IL , IN , KY , ME , MD , MA , MI , MN , MT , NV , NH , NJ , NM , NY , OR , PA , SD , TN , TX , UT , VT , VA , WA , WV , WI , WY , DC (NPIN, 2007)

Canada: NB , NS(NPIN, 2007)

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Habitat

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This is a dune and rock crevice specialist. (Weatherbee, 2006) Open, slightly moist areas from coastal dunes to alpine meadows. (WTU, 2009) This species can be found in a wide range of habitats and is variable. Although it occurs well into the mountains, in alpine regions it is replaced by Alpine Goldenrod (S. multiradiata). The native habitat is generally coastal sand dunes and open mountain slopes and valleys. (NPIN, 2007)
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Life Expectancy

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It is a perennial. (WTU, 2009)
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Look Alikes

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Alpine Goldenrod (S. multiradiata) is similar but with bristly hairs on the edges of its leaf stalks. (NPIN, 2007)
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Morphology

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Overall This is a glabrous perennial growing from a short woody base or short rhizome. (WTU, 2009)

Flowers It has large, robust upright heads. (Weatherbee, 2006) This plant is usually more or less glutinous (sticky) at least in the inflorescence and peduncles. Inflorescence is long and narrow to short and compact. The flower heads often have long pecuncles (stems). Flower bracts are imbricate (overlapping) and blunt. There are nromally 8 ray flowers and 13 disk flowers, all of which are yellow. (WTU, 2009) The appearance is of many small yellow flower heads in a narrow long cluster. (NPIN, 2007)

Leaves become smaller toward the tip of the stem. (Weatherbee, 2006) Basal leaves are oblanceolate to spatulate, toothed or nearly entire, and blunt or rounded. The cauline (stem) leaves are progressively reduced and few. (WTU, 2009) The largest leaves are at the base. (NPIN, 2007)

Stems are smooth. (Weatherbee, 2006) Never has rows of hairs on petioles. (WTU, 2009) Generally there are several stems in a clump. (NPIN, 2007)

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Size

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Plant is 5-80 cm tall. (WTU, 2009)

Flowers The involucre (bracts subtending the flower) is 4-6 mm high. (WTU, 2009)

Leaves are up to 15 cm long including the petiole x 3 cm wide. (WTU, 2009)

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Solidago simplex

provided by wikipedia EN

Solidago simplex, the Mt. Albert goldenrod[2] or sticky goldenrod, is a North American plant species in the genus Solidago of the sunflower family. It is widespread across much of Canada, parts of the United States, and northeastern Mexico.[3][4]

Description

Solidago simplex is a perennial herb up to 80 cm (32 inches) tall, with a branching underground caudex. One plant system can produce as many as 10 stems. Leaves are long and narrow, up to 16 cm (6.6 inches) long, produced on the stem as well as at the base. One stem can sometimes produce as many as 150 small yellow flower heads, each with 7-16 ray florets surrounding 6-31 disc florets. [5]

Varieties

At least eight varieties of the species may be recognised:[3][4][5]

References

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Solidago simplex: Brief Summary

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Solidago simplex, the Mt. Albert goldenrod or sticky goldenrod, is a North American plant species in the genus Solidago of the sunflower family. It is widespread across much of Canada, parts of the United States, and northeastern Mexico.

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