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Gnaphalium uliginosum is native to Europe; it is not clear whether some or all of the North American plants may have been introduced into the flora.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 19: 429, 430 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Description

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Annuals, 3–15(–25) cm; taprooted or fibrous-rooted. Stems erect, usually branched from bases, sometimes simple, closely to loosely tomentose. Leaf blades oblanceolate, 1–5 cm × 1–3 mm. Bracts subtending heads linear, oblanceolate, or obovate, 5–15 × 1–2 mm, usually surpassing glomerules. Heads borne singly or in terminal, capitate glomerules, sometimes in axillary glomerules. Involucres 2–4 mm. Phyllaries brownish, bases woolly, inner narrowly triangular with whitish, acute apices. 2n = 14.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 19: 429, 430 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Synonym

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Filaginella uliginosa (Linnaeus) Opiz
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 19: 429, 430 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
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eFloras

Gnaphalium uliginosum

provided by wikipedia EN

Gnaphalium uliginosum or marsh cudweed[2] is an annual plant found on damp, disturbed ground and tracks. It is very widespread across much of Europe, Asia, and North America.[3][4][5] It is very common on damp, arable grasslands, paths, and on acid soils.

Description

It is a very woolly annual, growing 4–20 cm tall.[6]

The leaves are wooly on both sides. They are 1 to 5 cm long, narrow oblong shaped.[6]

The flower heads are 3 to 4 mm long. They are arranged in clusters of 3 to 10, surrounded by long leaves. The flower head bracts are wooly, and pale below, with dark chaffy hairless tips. The florets are brownish yellow. The stigmas are pale.[6]

It flowers from July until September.[6]

References

  1. ^ The Plant List, Gnaphalium uliginosum L.
  2. ^ "BSBI List 2007". Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland. Archived from the original (xls) on 2015-01-25. Retrieved 2014-10-17.
  3. ^ Flora of North America, Gnaphalium uliginosum Linnaeus, 1753. Marsh cudweed
  4. ^ Flora of China, Gnaphalium uliginosum Linnaeus, 1753. 湿生鼠麴草 shi sheng shu qu cao
  5. ^ Altervista Flora Italiana, Gnaphalium uliginosum L. includes photos, drawings, and European distribution map
  6. ^ a b c d Rose, Francis (1981). The Wild Flower Key. Frederick Warne & Co. pp. 377–380. ISBN 0-7232-2419-6.
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Gnaphalium uliginosum: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Gnaphalium uliginosum or marsh cudweed is an annual plant found on damp, disturbed ground and tracks. It is very widespread across much of Europe, Asia, and North America. It is very common on damp, arable grasslands, paths, and on acid soils.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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wikipedia EN