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Image of Pointed Dagger Moth
Unresolved name

Pointed Dagger Moth

Acronicta lanceolaria (Grt.)

Conservation Status

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Local and rare in Alberta, but no obvious concerns.
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Cyclicity

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Alberta specimens have been collected in early June.
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Distribution

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Nova Scotia to British Columbia, but apparently rare everywhere. In Alberta it has been collected in the dunes southeast Edgerton and in the Red Deer River valley north of Jenner.
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General Description

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A large pale grey moth without prominent markings. Forewings more pointed than in most noctuids, powdery pale grey with the orbicular and reniform spots and postmedian lines variably but faintly marked by white scales. Hindwings shining white. Similar to A. oblinita, but larger and with wings narrower, more pointed and without the darker markings. Also the row of dark terminal dots, which is prominent in oblinita, is obscure or lacking in lanceolaria. Antennae simple.
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Habitat

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Dry or sandy habitats with cherry and other shrubs.
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Life Cycle

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Poorly known. There is a single annual brood and the adults are attracted to light.
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Trophic Strategy

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No Alberta data: elsewhere reported larval hosts include Large-tooth aspen (Populus grandidenata), willow (Salix) and cherry (Prunus) (Rockburne and Lafontaine 1996). Prentice lists single larval host records for four tree species; tamarack (Larix), Red pine (Pinus), poplar (Populus) and white birch (Betula papyrifera).
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Acronicta lanceolaria

provided by wikipedia EN

Acronicta lanceolaria, the lanceolate dagger moth or pointed dagger, is a moth of the family Noctuidae. The species was first described by Augustus Radcliffe Grote in 1875.[1][2] It is found in North America, from Nova Scotia to British Columbia. It is listed as a species of special concern and believed extirpated in the US state of Connecticut.[3]

Adults are on wing in early June in one generation.

Reported larval hosts include Populus grandidentata, Salix and Rubus.[4]

References

  1. ^ Beccaloni, G.; Scoble, M.; Kitching, I.; Simonsen, T.; Robinson, G.; Pitkin, B.; Hine, A.; Lyal, C., eds. (2003). "Acronicta lanceolaria". The Global Lepidoptera Names Index. Natural History Museum. Retrieved October 20, 2020.
  2. ^ Savela, Markku (August 29, 2020). "Acronicta lanceolaria (Grote, 1875)". Lepidoptera and Some Other Life Forms. Retrieved October 20, 2020.
  3. ^ "Connecticut's Endangered, Threatened and Special Concern Species 2015". State of Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Bureau of Natural Resources. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  4. ^ Anweiler, G. G. (December 10, 2004). "Species Details Acronicta lanceolaria". University of Alberta Museums. E.H. Strickland Entomological Museum. Retrieved November 12, 2020.

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Acronicta lanceolaria: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Acronicta lanceolaria, the lanceolate dagger moth or pointed dagger, is a moth of the family Noctuidae. The species was first described by Augustus Radcliffe Grote in 1875. It is found in North America, from Nova Scotia to British Columbia. It is listed as a species of special concern and believed extirpated in the US state of Connecticut.

Adults are on wing in early June in one generation.

Reported larval hosts include Populus grandidentata, Salix and Rubus.

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