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Unresolved name

solanum lycopersicum

Conservation

provided by Natural History Museum Species of the day
As a species, Solanum lycopersicum is not rare or threatened, but many older (called “heirloom”) varieties of tomatoes are disappearing from cultivation and there is some concern that their genes may be lost for use in future plant breeding. Gene banks for tomatoes preserve these variants.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Natural History Museum, London
author
Dr Sandy Knapp

Distribution habitat

provided by Natural History Museum Species of the day
Distribution
The wild relatives of tomatoes are all native to the deserts of western South America (the Atacama Desert), but Solanum lycopersicum itself is not really known from the wild.Tomatoes are cultivated on all continents except Antarctica, from sea level to 3000 metres elevation, and in temperate climates they are grown as an annual. Tomatoes can become weedy and escape from gardens, when they do, they can be a problem for rarer wild relatives that they can hybridise with.

Habitat
Tomatoes are grown in gardens and rich soil where they escape from gardens they often grow near rubbish dumps or sewage works where soil is high in nutrients.They can grow in quite dry areas, but grow bigger and produce more fruit when they are well-watered.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Natural History Museum, London
author
Dr Sandy Knapp

Introduction

provided by Natural History Museum Species of the day
The cultivated tomato, Solanum lycopersicum, is grown worldwide for its fruits.Tomatoes are native to South America, but were brought to Europe sometime in the 1500s, where they soon became popular and were exported around the world (cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Natural History Museum, London
author
Dr Sandy Knapp