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Image of <i>Lineus torquatus</i>

Lineus torquatus

External Appearance

provided by Nemertea

(from Coe, W. R. (1905). Nemerteans of the west and northwest coasts of America.. Bull. Mus. comp. Zool. Harv.. 1-318)Usually dark reddish brown, chocolate or purple above, sometimes flecked with minute, inconspicuous whitish specks; paler and commonly more reddish beneath; a narrow transverse band of white passes across dorsal surface at posterior ends of cephalic furrows; a white spot is situated on tip of snout and is usually, though not always, connected with transverse white band by white borders to cephalic furrows. Color of body is retained for many years in alcohol.

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Ritger, Rebecca
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Ritger, Rebecca
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General Description

provided by Nemertea

(from Coe, W. R. (1901). Papers from the Harriman Alaska Expedition. XX. The nemerteans.. Proc. Wash. Acad. Sci.. 1-110.)

Head with deep, horizontal furrows. Proboscis usually with three muscular layers and muscular crossings. Caudal cirrus absent. Body long and slender, rounded or flattened; very contractile.

No ocelli in adult. Dark, reddish brown or purple, with a narrow transverse white band connecting posterior ends of cephalic furrows across dorsal surface of neck.

(from Coe, W. R. (1905). Nemerteans of the west and northwest coasts of America.. Bull. Mus. comp. Zool. Harv.. 1-318)
Body rather stout for genus; head short, pointed in front, slightly demarcated from body; cephalic furrows rather short; ocelli absent; length commonly 10 to 20 or, rarely, 40 cm in extension, width 3 to 5 mm.

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Ritger, Rebecca
author
Ritger, Rebecca
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Nemertea

Habitat

provided by Nemertea

(from Coe, W. R. (1905). Nemerteans of the west and northwest coasts of America.. Bull. Mus. comp. Zool. Harv.. 1-318)Common in mud and under stones in muddy localities in Prince William Sound, Alaska (Coe, 1901). Also collected by Dr. W.H. Dall under stones, Unga Island, Alaska. These latter specimens, although collected 30 years ago, still retain a deep purple color, and the white spot on tip of snout can still be distinguished.
The individuals are hardy and of sluggish movements. They do not break up nor contract excessively when thrown into killing fluid, and the proboscis is not usually everted when the animal is killed. Some, especially the smaller ones, when preserved are nearly cylindrical, but most individuals are flattened ventrally.

license
cc-by-nc
copyright
Ritger, Rebecca
author
Ritger, Rebecca
partner site
Nemertea