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Distribution in Egypt

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Mediterranean region.

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Global Distribution

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Europe, north Africa, southwest to central Asia, Japan, north America, New Zealand; probably native to western Asia.

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Habitat

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Gardens, orchards, fields.

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Life Expectancy

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Annual.

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Description

provided by eFloras
Annuals, sometimes biennials. Stems diffuse, ca. 10-20 cm tall, 20-50 cm, densely pubescent with multicellular hairs often more densely so along 2 lines. Opposite leaves in (2 or)3 or 4(or 5) pairs; petiole 1-8 mm; leaf blade ovate-lanceolate to suborbicular, (6-)10-20(-25) X (5-)8-15(-20) mm, evenly sparsely pubescent on both surfaces, margin flat, obtusely crenate-serrate, 3-6(-10)-toothed per side. Racemes terminal, lax, very long; bracts alternate, leaflike, petiolate, uppermost ones smaller than others. Fruiting pedicel (1.2-)1.5-3(-4) cm, usually longer than bract. Calyx 4-lobed; lobes ovate-lanceolate, 5-8(-10) X 2.5-3.5(-4) mm in fruit, sparsely pubescent, veins 3. Corolla usually blue, rotate, 0.8-1.4 cm in diam., throat sparsely hairy; lobes ovate to orbicular. Stamens slightly shorter than corolla. Capsule obcordate, strongly compressed, 4-6 X 6-9 mm, apically notched at right to obtuse angle; lobes obtuse, glandular hairy, venation conspicuously reticulate. Style 2-3 mm, exserted. Seeds slightly navicular, usually 1.4-2.3 X 0.9-1.6 mm; seed coat deeply rugose dorsally. Fl. Mar-May. 2n = 28.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 18: 70 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of China @ eFloras.org
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Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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Distribution

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Europe, W. & C. Asia, Himalaya, introduced to E. Asia and America.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
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K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
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Distribution

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Anhui, Fujian, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Taiwan, W Xinjiang (Yining Xian), E Xizang, Yunnan, Zhejiang [native to SW Asia and since the 19th century spread over most of the world].
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 18: 70 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of China @ eFloras.org
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Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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eFloras.org
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Elevation Range

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1500 m
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
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Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
author
K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
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eFloras.org
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Habitat

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Naturalized in waste fields and roadsides; below 1700 m.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 18: 70 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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eFloras.org
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Description

provided by Flora of Zimbabwe
Low spreading annual herb; leaves ovate with strongly serrated margins; flowers blue; fruits with 2 divergent lobes.
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Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
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Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Veronica persica Poir. Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/species.php?species_id=151720
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Mark Hyde
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Bart Wursten
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Petra Ballings
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Frequency

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Rare
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Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
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Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Veronica persica Poir. Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/species.php?species_id=151720
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Mark Hyde
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Bart Wursten
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Petra Ballings
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Worldwide distribution

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A species originally from W. Asia and occurring throughout Europe.
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Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings
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Hyde, M.A., Wursten, B.T. and Ballings, P. (2002-2014). Veronica persica Poir. Flora of Zimbabwe website. Accessed 28 August 2014 at http://www.zimbabweflora.co.zw/speciesdata/species.php?species_id=151720
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Mark Hyde
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Bart Wursten
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Petra Ballings
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Veronica persica

provided by wikipedia EN

Veronica persica (common names: birdeye speedwell,[1] common field-speedwell,[2] Persian speedwell, large field speedwell, bird's-eye, or winter speedwell) is a flowering plant in the family Plantaginaceae. It is native to Eurasia and is widespread as an introduced species in the British Isles (where it was first recorded in 1825[3]), North America, eastern Asia, including Japan and China, and Australia.

Description

"
Unripe fruit of V. persica

Veronica persica is an annual or winter annual herb that reproduces from seed.

Its cotyledons are triangular with truncated bases. The short-stalked leaves are broadly ovate with coarsely serrated margins, and measure one to two centimetres (0.4 to 0.8 in) long. The leaves are paired on the lower stem and are alternately arranged on the upper parts. The plant has weak stems that form a dense, prostrate groundcover. The tips of stems often grow upright.

The flowers are roughly one centimetre (0.4 in) wide[4] and are sky-blue with dark stripes and white centers. They are zygomorphic, having only one vertical plane of symmetry. They are solitary on long, slender, hairy stalks in the leaf axils.

The seeds are transversely rugose and measure between one and two millimetres (0.04 and 0.08 in) long. There are five to 10 seeds per locule in the fruit.[5]

Veronica persica can be distinguished from similar species by its heart-shaped fruit with two widely-separated lobes.[3][4][5]

Horticultural uses

Although many species in the genus are used in gardens (such as V. exalta, V. incana, V. gentianoides, V. longifolia, V. perfoliata, and V. spicata),[6] this species is generally seen as a weed[7] and has no known horticultural uses.

Herbal medicine

Afghani herbalist, Mahomet Allum, used the plant to treat patients with heart trouble, in Adelaide, Australia, in the mid-20th century.[8]

References

  1. ^ "Veronica persica". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 29 July 2015.
  2. ^ "BSBI List 2007". Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland. Archived from the original (xls) on 2015-01-25. Retrieved 2014-10-17.
  3. ^ a b Blamey, M., et al. 2003. Wild flowers of Britain and Ireland: The Complete Guide to the British and Irish Flora. A & C Black, London.
  4. ^ a b Rhoads, A. F. and T. A. Block. Plants of Pennsylvania: An Illustrated Manual, 2nd ed. University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia. 2007.
  5. ^ a b Gleason, H. A. and A. Cronquist. Manual of Vascular Plants of Northeastern United States and Adjacent Canada, 2nd ed. New York Botanical Gardens, New York, New York. 1991.
  6. ^ Thomas, G. S. Perennial Garden Plants or the Modern Florilegium, 2nd ed. J. M. Dent and Sons, London. 1992.
  7. ^ Veronica persica. USDA Plants Database.
  8. ^ Affifudin, Amirul Husni (Sep 2018). "Historical Archaeology Report: Mahomet Allum Khan". ResearchGate. p. 24. doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.23125.27365. Retrieved 27 November 2019.
"
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Veronica persica: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Veronica persica (common names: birdeye speedwell, common field-speedwell, Persian speedwell, large field speedwell, bird's-eye, or winter speedwell) is a flowering plant in the family Plantaginaceae. It is native to Eurasia and is widespread as an introduced species in the British Isles (where it was first recorded in 1825), North America, eastern Asia, including Japan and China, and Australia.

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