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Comments

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The seeds have a number of local medicinal uses.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 16: 305 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of China @ eFloras.org
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Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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Description

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Herbs annual, twining, with retrorsely hirsute axial parts. Stems 2-5 m. Petiole 2-15 cm; leaf blade broadly ovate or nearly circular, 4-15 X 4.5-14 cm, hirtellous, base cordate, margin entire or ± 3- (or 5)-lobed, apex acuminate. Inflorescences axillary, 1- to few flowered; peduncle 1.5-18.5 cm; bracts linear or filiform, 5-8 mm, spreading hirtellous. Pedicel 2-7 mm. Sepals lanceolate, ± equal, 1-2.5 cm, abaxially spreading hirsute, subglabrous apically, with a linear acumen, hairs swollen based. Corolla pale to bright blue with whitish tube, fading to pinkish in age, funnelform, 5-6(-8) cm, glabrous. Stamens included, unequal. Pistil included; ovary glabrous, 3-loculed. Stigma 3-lobed. Capsule straw colored, ovoid to ± globose, 8-10 mm in diam., glabrous. Seeds black, ovoid-trigonous, 5-6 mm, gray puberulent. 2n = 30*.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 16: 305 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
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Distribution

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Probably a native of the New World tropics, now widely cultivated and naturalised in other tropical and temperate areas.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
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K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
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Distribution

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Cultivated or escaped. Anhui, Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hainan, Hebei, Henan, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Nei Mongol, Ningxia, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi, Sichuan, Taiwan, Xizang, Yunnan, Zhejiang [?Japan (Ryukyu Islands), Kashmir, Myanmar, Nepal, New Guinea, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Thailand; native of South America, now nearly circumtropical]
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 16: 305 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
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Elevation Range

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760-2000 m
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
author
K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
project
eFloras.org
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Habitat

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Thickets on mountain slopes, waysides, fields, hedges; 0-1600 m.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 16: 305 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
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Synonym

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Convolvulus nil Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. ed. 2. 1: 219. 1762; C. hederaceus Linnaeus; Ipomoea hederacea (Linnaeus) Jacquin; I. nil var. setosa (Blume) Boerlage; I. scabra Forsskål; I. setosa Blume; I. trichocalyx Steudel; I. vaniotiana H. Léveillé; Pharbitis nil (Linnaeus) Choisy.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 16: 305 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
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eFloras

Ipomoea hederacea

provided by wikipedia EN
Not to be confused with Ipomoea hederifolia or ivy morning glory

Ipomoea hederacea, the ivy-leaved morning glory,[1] is a flowering plant in the bindweed family. The species is native to tropical parts of the Americas, and has more recently been introduced to North America. It now occurs there from Arizona to Florida and north to Ontario and North Dakota. Like most members of the family, it is a climbing vine with alternate leaves on twining stems. The flowers are blue to rose-purple with a white inner throat and emerge in summer and continue until late fall. The leaves are typically three-lobed, but sometimes may be five-lobed or entire. Flowers occur in clusters of one to three and are 2.5-4.5 cm long and wide. The sepals taper to long, recurved tips and measure 12–24 mm long. The species shares some features with the close relative Ipomoea purpurea.[2]

Ecology

The morning glories are little used by white-tailed deer. The large seeds are taken infrequently by northern bobwhite and seed-eating songbirds. Flowers are used by some of the larger butterflies such as swallowtails and fritillaries and the ruby-throated hummingbird.[2]

Most of the pollinations of Ipomoea hederacea are achieved by self-pollination, with a selfing rate of 93% observed in one population.[3]

Ipomoea hederacea has been studied as a target of character displacement. When it co-occurs with Ipomoea purpurea, natural selection favors individuals of I. hederacea with anthers that are more tightly clustered around the stigma. This is to presumably reduce pollinations of I. hederacea by I. purpurea, which, should they occur, results in sterile seeds, wasting valuable resources of the parent plant and reducing fitness. This fitness reduction is not reciprocal, however, as I. hederacea pollen does not germinate on I. purpurea stigmas, thus giving the latter species a potential advantage competitively. This selective pressure leads the anthers to form a barrier over the stigma of I. hederacea to protect from pollen from other species making contact, but possibly increasing self-pollination, as well. When I. hederacea occurs by itself, however, no such selective pressure is evident and anther barriers are looser and less consistent.[4]

References

  1. ^ "BSBI List 2007". Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland. Archived from the original (xls) on 2015-01-25. Retrieved 2014-10-17.
  2. ^ a b Miller, J.H., & Miller, K.V. (1999). Forest plants of the southeast and their wildlife uses. Champaign, IL: Kings Time Printing.
  3. ^ Ennos, R. A. (1981). "Quantitative studies of the mating system in two sympatric species of Ipomoea (Convolvulaceae)". Genetica. 57 (2): 93–98. doi:10.1007/bf00131233.
  4. ^ Smith, Robin Ann; Mark D Rausher (January 2008). "Experimental evidence that selection favors character displacement in the ivyleaf morning glory" (PDF). The American Naturalist. 171 (1): 1–9. doi:10.1086/523948. ISSN 1537-5323. PMID 18171146.

 src= Media related to Ipomoea hederacea at Wikimedia Commons

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Ipomoea hederacea: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN
Not to be confused with Ipomoea hederifolia or ivy morning glory

Ipomoea hederacea, the ivy-leaved morning glory, is a flowering plant in the bindweed family. The species is native to tropical parts of the Americas, and has more recently been introduced to North America. It now occurs there from Arizona to Florida and north to Ontario and North Dakota. Like most members of the family, it is a climbing vine with alternate leaves on twining stems. The flowers are blue to rose-purple with a white inner throat and emerge in summer and continue until late fall. The leaves are typically three-lobed, but sometimes may be five-lobed or entire. Flowers occur in clusters of one to three and are 2.5-4.5 cm long and wide. The sepals taper to long, recurved tips and measure 12–24 mm long. The species shares some features with the close relative Ipomoea purpurea.

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Ipomoea nil

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Ipomoea nil is a species of Ipomoea morning glory known by several common names, including picotee morning glory, ivy morning glory, and Japanese morning glory. It is native to most of the tropical world, and has been introduced widely.

Cultivation

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Asagao

It is cultivated as an ornamental plant in many places, and the descendants of garden escapees now grow wild. This is a climbing annual herb with three-pointed leaves 3 to 8 centimeters long. The flowers are several centimeters wide and appear in various shades of blue, pink or rose, often with white stripes or edges or blends of colors. Common cultivars include 'Scarlet O'Hara', 'Early Call', and 'Rose Silk'. [1][2]

Hybrids, for instance with I. purpurea, have been developed. Some of these have been given the name I. x imperialis (Imperial Japanese morning glory), which is not official. Cultivars include 'Sunrise Serenade'. Alternative nomenclatures include Ipomoea nil x imperialis, as in 'Cameo Elegance', or Ipomoea nil' 'Imperialis'. [3]

Morning glories in Japan

 src=
"Morning Glories in Iriya, Eastern Capital" (1866), No 28 of "The Thirty-six Selected Flower Scenes" by Hiroshige II
 src=
The Iriya Morning Glory Market, Tokyo (2008)

Morning glories are popular in Japan. They are believed to have been introduced there directly from China or via Korea in the Heian period of the 8th to 9th centuries. During the Edo period of the 17th to 19th centuries, as more people started to live in cities, a fad for growing potted morning glories of different colors and sizes swept through the country. The pots are often equipped with cylindrical structures called andon shitate (Japanese: 行燈仕立て), which look like Japanese lanterns at night.[4]

In early summer, morning glory markets are held in large cities in Japan, where merchants and hobbyists sell the flowers. The largest of such markets is the Iriya Morning Glory Market (Japanese: 入谷朝顔市, July 6–8), held along the roads surrounding Shingenji Temple, commonly called "Iriya Kishibojin", in Iriya, Taito-ku, Tokyo.[5]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Morning Glory Scarlet O'Hara". The National Gardening Association. Retrieved 2009-01-15.
  2. ^ Halpin, Anne (2007-05-01). "TWINERS: Morning glories, moonflowers, and their relatives". Horticulture magazine. Retrieved 2009-01-15.
  3. ^ "NaturalPedia". Archived from the original on 2011-07-14. Retrieved 2011-03-17.
  4. ^ Iriya Asagao Matsuri (Morning Glory Festival) (Go Tokyo)
  5. ^ All About Iriya Asagao (Morning Glory) Market/Festival: how to get to, schedule & souvenirs (Tokyo Direct Diary)

 title=
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Ipomoea nil: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Ipomoea nil is a species of Ipomoea morning glory known by several common names, including picotee morning glory, ivy morning glory, and Japanese morning glory. It is native to most of the tropical world, and has been introduced widely.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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wikipedia EN